Locals say skiing party move was ‘madness’ / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Locals say skiing party move was ‘madness’. People in Finnmark County are criticising the skiers’ choice of route following yesterday’s tragedy on Sorbmegaisa. “Sorbmegaisa is a Sami name meaning ‘Accident Mountain’, or something in that vein”, local Olav Skogmo told NRK, “It hasn’t been many days since I looked at the map and studied the mountain formation there. I saw the name and thought to myself that it refers to something or other in the past about how it looks or what happened back then [...] one doesn’t have to challenge death.” According to another local, Ørjan Berthelsen, “I have skied along the route on one occasion. It’s madness to have chosen it bearing in mind the avalanche conditions and the recent weather. Many foreigners ski in these mountains but without knowledge of the local area like many have here, which I would say one needs.”

sorbmegaisaavalanche, norwayskitragedy



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Locals say skiing party move was ‘madness’

Published on Tuesday, 20th March, 2012 at 09:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .
Last Updated on 20th March 2012 at 09:56.

People in Finnmark County are criticising the skiers’ choice of route following yesterday’s tragedy on Sorbmegaisa.



“Sorbmegaisa is a Sami name meaning ‘Accident Mountain’, or something in that vein”, local Olav Skogmo told NRK, “It hasn’t been many days since I looked at the map and studied the mountain formation there. I saw the name and thought to myself that it refers to something or other in the past about how it looks or what happened back then [...] one doesn’t have to challenge death.”

According to another local, Ørjan Berthelsen, “I have skied along the route on one occasion. It’s madness to have chosen it bearing in mind the avalanche conditions and the recent weather. Many foreigners ski in these mountains but without knowledge of the local area like many have here, which I would say one needs.”

The avalanche, which happened at approximately 2 p.m. in Kåfjord Municipality, claimed the lives of five foreign tourists, one French and the four others of Swiss origin. A sixth person in his 50s who survived was sent to the University Hospital of North Norway with moderate injuries. His condition is said to be stable.

Press spokesperson Jan Fredrik Frantzen tells The Foreigner, “there is no change in his condition today, but his injuries mean he will be here for a few days. The other survivors are being cared for.”

43 people have been killed in avalanches in Nord-Norge and on Svalbard since 1986, reports Nordlys.



Published on Tuesday, 20th March, 2012 at 09:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and John Price      .
Last updated on 20th March 2012 at 09:56.

This post has the following tags: sorbmegaisaavalanche, norwayskitragedy.





  
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