Longer working hours make risk of dementia higher / News / The Foreigner

Longer working hours make risk of dementia higher. Joint British and Finnish study links long hours to reduced ability to achieve results. Extra-long working-days have now been proven to be hazardous to your mental health. Cerebral functions at risk A report from a study conducted by researchers from both University College London and the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (Arbeidshelseinstituttet) has shown that a person’s reasoning abilities, short-term memory, and vocabulary are affected by working too many hours in a week. This can lead to dementia.

performance, results, depression, sleep, alcohol, tests, dementia, cognitive, function, reduced, cerebral, overtime, risk, british, finnish



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Longer working hours make risk of dementia higher

Published on Wednesday, 10th June, 2009 at 00:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Joint British and Finnish study links long hours to reduced ability to achieve results.

Overworked
Overworked
Photo: Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock Images


Extra-long working-days have now been proven to be hazardous to your mental health.

Cerebral functions at risk

A report from a study conducted by researchers from both University College London and the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (Arbeidshelseinstituttet) has shown that a person’s reasoning abilities, short-term memory, and vocabulary are affected by working too many hours in a week. This can lead to dementia.

“The disadvantages of working overtime must, therefore, be taken seriously”, Marianne Virtanen, a researcher at the Institute writes in a press-release.

Depression

The researchers have not yet been able to draw any conclusions as to why long working hours ultimately reduce cognitive function, but their report cites several factors that could contribute to its decline; sleeping problems, depression, an unhealthy lifestyle and cardiovascular diseases.

Cumulative

The study found that performance got worse as the length of the working week increased. Those who slept less also reported both higher levels of alcohol consumption, and more symptoms of depression.

“It is particularly important to examine whether the effects are long-lasting, and whether long working hours predict more serious conditions such as dementia" says Professor Mika Kivimäki.

The researchers found that those with a normal working week of between 35 and 40 hours performed better than those who worked an average of 41 to 55, or more.

2,214 middle-aged British civil servants took part in the study. All of the participants took five cognitive tests on two occasions; between 1997 and 1999, and again between 2002 and 2004.



Published on Wednesday, 10th June, 2009 at 00:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: performance, results, depression, sleep, alcohol, tests, dementia, cognitive, function, reduced, cerebral, overtime, risk, british, finnish.





  
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