Lutheranism reigns supreme in new Norway government / News / The Foreigner

Lutheranism reigns supreme in new Norway government. Norway’s new government is the most ecclesiastical one in 60 years, reports say. 17 of 18 Ministers said they belonged to the Norwegian Church, according to Vårt Land’s questionnaire sent to the newly-elected officials. Progress' (FrP) Minister of Transport Ketil Solvik-Olsen is the only Minister in government who does not belong to the Norwegian Church or with any religious affiliation.

norwaygovernment, norwayreligions



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Lutheranism reigns supreme in new Norway government

Published on Wednesday, 30th October, 2013 at 20:39 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last Updated on 30th October 2013 at 20:50.

Norway’s new government is the most ecclesiastical one in 60 years, reports say.

A Norwegian church spire
A Norwegian church spire
Photo: color line/Flickr


17 of 18 Ministers said they belonged to the Norwegian Church, according to Vårt Land’s questionnaire sent to the newly-elected officials.

Progress' (FrP) Minister of Transport Ketil Solvik-Olsen is the only Minister in government who does not belong to the Norwegian Church or with any religious affiliation.

“I think this is both a little sad and representas a weakness,” said General Secretary of the Christian Council of Norway Knut Refsdal.

“Norway has become a diverse society, culturally and religiously, and the government should mirror this,” he added.

The Church of Norway is the largest church in the country established after Lutheranism.

Up until May 21st last year, article 2 of the Norwegian Constitution stated that the “Evangelical-Lutheran religion shall remain the official religion of the State.”

It was also required under law that at least half of Cabinet representatives be members of the Norwegian Church.

This is no longer the case today following an amendment to the Constitution, which loosened ties between state and church.

Hallgeir Elstad, Professor at the Theological Faculty at the University of Oslo, told the Christian publication the previous requirement was particularly challenging for preceding Parties when it came to the formation of the government.

The Labour Party (Ap) encountered challenges due to several of its Ministers having withdrawn from the Norwegian Church, according to him.

Many of the Christian Democratic Party’s (KrF) members were also members of the Free Church. 

Another challenge for past Prime Ministers was that they were required to create a list of government officials who belonged to the Norwegian Church.

This is not an issue for current Prime Minister Erna Solberg despite the lack of religious diversity amongst her Ministers, Vårt Land reports.

“Fortunately, the picture is a slightly more complex if we include Deputy Ministers and political advisers,” said the Christian Council’s Knut Refsdal.

Editor's note: For readers wishing to know more about religious diversity in Norway, visit our column series page.




Published on Wednesday, 30th October, 2013 at 20:39 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last updated on 30th October 2013 at 20:50.

This post has the following tags: norwaygovernment, norwayreligions.





  
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