Luxembourg ECHR ruling has little effect on Norway / News / The Foreigner

Luxembourg ECHR ruling has little effect on Norway. Norwegian political Parties to the Right and Left do not plan to ban Muslim women wearing a niqab or burka in public for now. Their decision comes following today’s European Court of Human Rights verdict involving a French national who lives in France and is a devout Muslim. Politicians there introduced a veto in 2011 on women wearing a burka or a niqab in public. The plaintiff, who wears both “in accordance with her religious faith, culture, and personal convictions,” it is stated, applied to the Court on the grounds of this ban contravening three articles under the European Convention on Human Rights.

niqab, burka, norway, france, humanrights



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Luxembourg ECHR ruling has little effect on Norway

Published on Wednesday, 2nd July, 2014 at 00:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 2nd July 2014 at 01:01.

Norwegian political Parties to the Right and Left do not plan to ban Muslim women wearing a niqab or burka in public for now.

Young Saudi women in a niqab (illus. ph)
Neither Rightist nor Leftist politicians in Norway are changing stance on the issue of regulating wearing a niqab or burka publicly as in France.Young Saudi women in a niqab (illus. ph)
Photo: Walter Callens/Flickr


Their decision comes following today’s European Court of Human Rights verdict involving a French national who lives in France and is a devout Muslim. Politicians there introduced a veto in 2011 on women wearing a burka or a niqab in public.

The plaintiff, who wears both “in accordance with her religious faith, culture, and personal convictions,” it is stated, applied to the Court on the grounds of this ban contravening three articles under the European Convention on Human Rights.

“The applicant also emphasises that neither her husband nor any other member of her family puts pressure on her to dress in this manner. She adds that she wears the niqab in public and in private, but not systematically. She is thus content not to wear the niqab in certain circumstances but wishes to be able to wear it when she chooses to do so. Lastly, her aim is not to annoy others but to feel at inner peace with herself,” the ECHR document also reads.

She alleged the breaches involved Article 8 (the right to respect for private and family), Article 9 (the right to respect for freedom of thought, conscience and religion life), and Article 14 (prohibition of discrimination).

17 judges from an equal number of countries, including Norway’s Erik Møse and neighbouring Scandinavian country Sweden’s Helena Jäderblom, found no evidence of this, however.

A majority of the judges voted that France’s ban did not contravene Articles 8 and 9. They were unanimous there had been no violation of Article 14 combined with Articles 8 and 9.

Norway’s Progress Party (FrP) wanted to introduce a ban on wearing a niqab or burka in public in 2010, which was part of several proposals. They also lost a parliamentary vote to ban hijabs that same year.

The Foreigner spoke with the Rightist Party’s immigration policy spokesperson Mazyar Keshvari about Tuesday's European Court of Human Rights verdict.

According to him, one of the arguments used when their 2010 proposal banning niqabs and burkas in public was voted down was that it was against human rights.

“Our stance on the issue is the same now as it was then. We don’t find the wearing of the niqab or burkah in public acceptable in a modern democracy, especially if you know the reasons behind why they are worn,” he said.

“They are designed to avoid awakening lust in men, which I find very discriminatory. Firstly, it makes the women into an object, and secondly, it implies that men cannot control themselves.”

Iran-born Mr Keshvari MP added that they might come with a new suggestion in parliament now that they are in government, though he feels the chances of getting a majority are somewhat small.

“At the same time, the socialist parties will now have to find new excuses in light of today’s ECHR judgment regarding the European Convention on Human Rights.”

Labour’s (Ap) political advisor, Per Gunnar Dahl, told The Foreigner that he thinks that “in general, people may wear what they want at any time.”

“Today’s decision is a judicial one. We’re not going to open up a new political debate about it currently. A hypothetical issue is whether there is a need to regulate how people dress when weighed up against other concerns such as security and safety,” he commented.

“It’s a court decision on a clarification of judicial policy in this case,” said Eirik Sivertsen, spokesperson on immigration and integration policy for the Labour Party. “It still remains the political view that we can regulate these matters, but would we want to?”



Published on Wednesday, 2nd July, 2014 at 00:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 2nd July 2014 at 01:01.

This post has the following tags: niqab, burka, norway, france, humanrights.





  
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