‘Mandela managed to bring out the best,’ Norway King Harald says / News / The Foreigner

‘Mandela managed to bring out the best,’ Norway King Harald says. South Africa and the world mourned the loss of South African and anti-apartheid fighter Nelson Mandela, who passed away on Thursday, aged 95. “The song from South Africa, the one many of us associate with a folk song for freedom, has met us this morning,” said President of the Norwegian Parliament Olaf Michael “Olemic” Thommessen,” Friday.             “Today, it was the song from a population that is mourning over the loss of a great leader,” he continued during the opening of the parliamentary meeting.

nelsonmandela, norwayking, kingharald



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‘Mandela managed to bring out the best,’ Norway King Harald says

Published on Sunday, 8th December, 2013 at 11:47 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

South Africa and the world mourned the loss of South African and anti-apartheid fighter Nelson Mandela, who passed away on Thursday, aged 95.

The Late Nelson Mandela
The memorial at Oslo's Nobel Peace Center.The Late Nelson Mandela
Photo: ©2013 Linn Schjerven/The Foreigner


“The song from South Africa, the one many of us associate with a folk song for freedom, has met us this morning,” said President of the Norwegian Parliament Olaf Michael “Olemic” Thommessen,” Friday.            

“Today, it was the song from a population that is mourning over the loss of a great leader,” he continued during the opening of the parliamentary meeting.

State leaders, celebrities and people from around the world paid their tributes and respect to perhaps the greatest fighter, change-maker, and reconciler in recent history.

Born in 1918, Nelson Mandela led the path to the transition from a white minority rule to a racially-integrated South Africa.

He joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1943 as a law student, campaigning against apartheid.

Their efforts were initially peaceful, but Mr. Mandela was arrested for sabotage in 1964 and sentenced to life imprisonment.

“We had no choice but to turn to violence,” he wrote in his autobiography. “I who had never been a soldier…had been given the task of starting an army.”

He continued his fight against South Africa’s segregated system within prison walls, making many improvements to the conditions of prisoners.

One of Mr. Mandela’s greatest efforts was his persistence to turn to negotiation with the ruling government as a mean to fight apartheid.

“The crucible of prison seemed to add a deep understanding of the human condition and a profound ability to empathize with others,” said Archbishop Desmond Tutu about his late friend on Friday.

It was especially in the late 1970s that Mr. Mandela’s influence began to transcend the walls of seclusion to reach the world, which was appealing for his release.

He would spend 27 years in prison – mostly in a small 8-foot square prison cell on Robben Island – until then South African President F. W. De Klerk ordered his release in 1990.

Both influential figures were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their roles in ending apartheid some three years later.

A year later, Mr. Mandela became the first black president of South Africa during the country’s first multi-racial democratic election.

 He only served one term of presidency in an effort to standardize the election process, stepping down in 1999.

“Nelson Mandela had a special ability to see beyond his own destiny and personal suffering,” said Norwegian Parliament President Olemic Thommessen.

“With the wisdom, warmth and integrity he showed during many critical moments, not only for politicians, but also for ordinary people worldwide,” he added.

In a statement signed by reigning Norway monarch King Harald V, the Royal Family wrote about Nelson Mandela:

“I have to admire his courage, wisdom and his ability to reconcile. In a situation characterized by violence and revenge he managed to bring out the best, both in himself and his fellow citizens.”

Incumbent Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg reflected upon what she had learned from Mr. Mandela.

“For me, it is has been an important message to remember that it is important to look for justice following a conflict. But it’s also important to look ahead, and it is always important to think about tomorrow,” she told NRK.

A memorial wall and memorial protocol has been set up at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo for people to pay their tributes.

The memorial is available to the public during the center’s opening hours, daily from 10.00 to 18.00. The memorial protocol is also accessible through: nobelpeacecenter.org.

“The sun will rise tomorrow, and the next day and the next…It may not appear as bright as yesterday, but life will carry on,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu said in his speed for Nelson Mandela, Friday.



Published on Sunday, 8th December, 2013 at 11:47 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.

This post has the following tags: nelsonmandela, norwayking, kingharald.





  
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