Many Norway rapes go unreported / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Many Norway rapes go unreported. One in 10 Norwegian women have been raped with only 11 per cent of rape victims reporting the crime, recently-released statistics show. Many offenders escape punishment. Jim Aage Nottestad, senior researcher at St Olav’s Hospital in Trondheim, believes that more than 12 per cent of the attacks that have taken place at parties where large quantities of alcohol were consumed involve rapists who are repeat offenders. Both men and women were asked in another survey if they had been victims of rape. The results were delivered to Minister of Justice Anders Anundsen, Minister of Health Bent Høie, and the Minister of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion Solveig Horne.

norwayrape, police, crime



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Many Norway rapes go unreported

Published on Wednesday, 21st May, 2014 at 22:24 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 21st May 2014 at 22:55.

One in 10 Norwegian women have been raped with only 11 per cent of rape victims reporting the crime, recently-released statistics show. Many offenders escape punishment.



Jim Aage Nottestad, senior researcher at St Olav’s Hospital in Trondheim, believes that more than 12 per cent of the attacks that have taken place at parties where large quantities of alcohol were consumed involve rapists who are repeat offenders.

Both men and women were asked in another survey if they had been victims of rape. The results were delivered to Minister of Justice Anders Anundsen, Minister of Health Bent Høie, and the Minister of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion Solveig Horne.

The poll revealed that 9.4 percent of all women asked had been raped. Half of the women said they had been raped before the age of 18, and the majority of them had known their attacker. This factor was also a reason for the reluctance to report the crime.

Moreover, a third of victims said they never spoke about their sexual attacks until researchers questioned them for the survey. 1.1 per cent of men asked in the poll said they had been raped, and that they had been victims of serious physical and domestic violence.

“These are serious crimes, and only 11 per cent [of victims] reported them” said researcher Siri Thoresen at the National Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS).

The NKVTS’ Ole Kristian Hjemdal told VG that “one of the reasons why so few choose to report it is that the victim says that it is no use.”

Amnesty International’s ‘Case Closed: Rape and Human Rights in the Nordic Countries' report states that a man who commits rape in Norway is unlikely to be punished.

“Increased efforts during the past few years, such as, for instance, improved access to rape units and amendments to the sexual offences provisions in the Penal Code have not changed this. In fact, the statistics show no real improvement,’ the report reads on page 118.  

According to the document, 84 per cent of all rape cases reported to the police never get to court. 36 per cent of all rape trials end with an acquittal, and most rapes in Norway are never reported.

The definition of rape in paragraph 192 of the Norwegian Penal Code applies to any person who:

  • Engages in sexual activity be means of violence or threats.
  • Engages in sexual activity with any person who is unconscious or incapable of resisting the act for any reason.
  • Compels any person to engage in sexual activity with another person, or to carry our similar acts with himself or herself by means of violence or threats.

A linguistic amendment to the Penal Code in 2000 regarding the word “force” meant courts were prevented from deciding whether the victim had tried hard enough to resist the rape.

The majority of sexual assaults not being reported to the police have led to victims being urged to notify officers of the crimes so that they may tackle the problem.

“We can get important information with new reports that can collectively provide a high clear-up rate [when put together with others],” Lena Reif, head of section for sexual offences at Kripos (National Criminal Investigation Service) told NRK.




Published on Wednesday, 21st May, 2014 at 22:24 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 21st May 2014 at 22:55.

This post has the following tags: norwayrape, police, crime.





  
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