Maria Amelie: ‘I’m afraid for my own life’ / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Maria Amelie: ‘I’m afraid for my own life’. Jailed refugee Maria Amelie and her parents fear persecution if they are deported back to Russia. “I am afraid for my own life. I have no connection to Russia and I speak more Norwegian than Russian,” Maria told to Dagsavisen on Friday. Her family was originally settled in the city of Vladikavkaz in North Ossetia, a republic in the Russian Federation in Northern Caucasus. However, neither Maria nor her parents have any contact with their Russian relatives and they do not even know if any of them are alive.

mariaamelie, caucasian, immigrantdeportation, policeimmigrationservice, appealsboard, une, lillehammer, kristinhalvorsen, jensstoltenberg, paalloenseth, oslo



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Maria Amelie: ‘I’m afraid for my own life’

Published on Sunday, 16th January, 2011 at 12:48 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last Updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:01.

Jailed refugee Maria Amelie and her parents fear persecution if they are deported back to Russia.



Killings

“I am afraid for my own life. I have no connection to Russia and I speak more Norwegian than Russian,” Maria told to Dagsavisen on Friday.

Her family was originally settled in the city of Vladikavkaz in North Ossetia, a republic in the Russian Federation in Northern Caucasus. However, neither Maria nor her parents have any contact with their Russian relatives and they do not even know if any of them are alive.

According to NRK, North Ossetia is known for its abandoned factories and a high rate of unemployment, but also for its extensive production and smuggling of vodka, which enabled criminal groups to gain a foothold in this area.

In 2008, the mayor of the capital Vladikavkaz and another well-known politician were shot and killed. At the time, police believed these were contract killings.

Nevertheless, the Norwegian government claims Maria’s family had left Russia because her father “had problems with his business there”, and therefore does not need any kind of protection.

Clumsy equality

Following the Immigration Appeals Board’s (UNE) decision to expel her and subsequent arrest, thousands of people expressed their support for Maria in five cities as well as on Facebook and other similar social networking sites.

Dagsavisen reported many commentators have written they feel police handled her arrest late on Wednesday night clumsily, after she was approached by eight plainclothes officers and bundled into the back of a van.

PM Jens Stoltenberg, who knew of her impending arrest, according to Dagbladet, understands that people are supporting her, but thinks that pursuing a strict immigration policy is extremely important.

“We must handle individuals equally, not give them special treatment just because somebody receives a lot of attention. If we bend the rules for one person, we will then get thousands of refugees lodging baseless applications for asylum. Nobody wants that,” he told NRK.

Moreover, Deputy Minister (Statssekretær) Pål K Lønseth, at the Ministry of Justice has told The Foreigner “if people stay in Norway of their own free will there would be no need for the immigration authorities.”

Glimmer of hope?

Kristin Halvorsen, leader of the Socialist Left Party (SV) believes that everyone who criticized the manner in which Maria was treated will support trying to achieve a more humane asylum policy.

“Norway has a stricter asylum policy than one might think. Maria Amelie’s case is not unique. We have had many similar cases, but none have received as much attention,” she told NTB.

Maria’s chances of being granted residence in Norway, either for work or family reunification reasons, are still uncertain. An employer has to prove she has special and useful competence, and she refuses to marry just for a permit.

“She has had several proposals, but has always said that she would marry for love. Marrying in order to stay in Norway has never been an option. It goes against all her principles,” boyfriend Eivin Trædal told VG.

In recent developments, Maria has now been offered a permanent job by trade magazine Teknisk Ukeblad. The government also says it has decided to revaluate the rules regarding immigration for employment purposes. This may allow her to apply for a permit from Russia, even if she is expelled.

“It is quite natural for the government to look at the regulations regarding labor immigration if it is revealed the rules in this specific, or other cases are not appropriate,” Pål K Lønseth tells Aftenposten.




Published on Sunday, 16th January, 2011 at 12:48 under the news category, by Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan.
Last updated on 26th January 2011 at 22:01.

This post has the following tags: mariaamelie, caucasian, immigrantdeportation, policeimmigrationservice, appealsboard, une, lillehammer, kristinhalvorsen, jensstoltenberg, paalloenseth, oslo.





  
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