Military confirms Hercules’ role / News / The Foreigner

Military confirms Hercules’ role. The ill-fated C-130J was not part of any tactical flying or involved in evasive manoeuvres at the time of the crash, Norwegian military personnel state. As the Swedish investigative commission continues work to find the cause, Lieutenant Colonel John Espen Lien, chief communications and public affairs officer, tells The Foreigner, “Of course the Hercules was part of operation ‘Cold Response’, but its mission was a routine personnel and material transport flight.” He adds that the nearest fighter jets were at least 100 kilometres when the plane smashed into Kebnekaise, killing all five aboard.

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Military confirms Hercules’ role

Published on Monday, 19th March, 2012 at 15:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The ill-fated C-130J was not part of any tactical flying or involved in evasive manoeuvres at the time of the crash, Norwegian military personnel state.

C-130J Super Hercules aircraft
C-130J Super Hercules aircraft
Photo: U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Chad Gibson


As the Swedish investigative commission continues work to find the cause, Lieutenant Colonel John Espen Lien, chief communications and public affairs officer, tells The Foreigner, “Of course the Hercules was part of operation ‘Cold Response’, but its mission was a routine personnel and material transport flight.”

He adds that the nearest fighter jets were at least 100 kilometres when the plane smashed into Kebnekaise, killing all five aboard.

“Everyone who knows about tactical flying is aware that you don’t try to fly over the highest mountain but over water instead, for example the nearest major lakes, Rautasjarve or Torneträsk,” says the Lt. Col.

In explaining how ‘Cold Response’ operations proceed, he uses an umbrella as an analogy.

“Armed forces, artillery and logistical transport flights operate underneath this, whilst fighter jets fly above it to secure air superiority.”

According to ‘Cold Response’ press spokesperson John Gystad, one form of training exercise involves several jets, some attack, and some defend. He also confirms the Hercules was not part of the fighting.

Meanwhile, Lt. Col. Lien adds that ‘Siv’ was not the only transport plane in the area at the time, but one of three.

“The flight crew had to wait until the German C-160 landed and then commenced its operations, and the third until ours had.”

“We don’t operate flights from A to B like civilian airliners, rather, A to C to D, E, then to B. The Hercules was bound from Evenes to Kiruna, but flew south after takeoff, then entered a holding pattern, before setting course to its final destination.”

Following yesterday’s memorial service for the deceased personnel, operation ‘Cold Response’ is proceeding as planned today.

“We have now moved into a ground scenario. There was an amphibious landing last night on the shores of the Malangen fjord in Troms Municipality. A multinational task force is now pushing enemy forces northwards passed Bardufoss,” concludes John Gystad.



Published on Monday, 19th March, 2012 at 15:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: operationcoldresponse, norwegianherculesc130j.





  
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