More Norway companies prefer Swedes / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner More Norway companies prefer Swedes. As Norway continues to need foreigners to fill jobs, its Scandinavian neighbours are continuing to gain success in the job application market. “Our franchisees report that they prefer Swedes. They are reliable, hardworking, and here purely to work,” says Alexander Gustavsen, head of operations for snacks and drinks shop chain Deli de Luca. Aftenposten also reports that some 60 per cent of this firm’s applicants are Swedish. According to Mr Gustavsen, “the figure’s always been highest in Oslo, but we’re noticing there’s also an increase in other parts of the country, for example in Stavanger.”

norwaywork, foreignersnorway, norwayimmigration



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

More Norway companies prefer Swedes

Published on Monday, 7th October, 2013 at 10:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th October 2013 at 12:23.

As Norway continues to need foreigners to fill jobs, its Scandinavian neighbours are continuing to gain success in the job application market.



“Our franchisees report that they prefer Swedes. They are reliable, hardworking, and here purely to work,” says Alexander Gustavsen, head of operations for snacks and drinks shop chain Deli de Luca.

Aftenposten also reports that some 60 per cent of this firm’s applicants are Swedish. According to Mr Gustavsen, “the figure’s always been highest in Oslo, but we’re noticing there’s also an increase in other parts of the country, for example in Stavanger.”

Competition within some sectors appears to be hotting up, generally. Young Swedes now make up about 20 per cent of Oslo’s labour migrants.

Whilst this brings a corresponding downward pressure on pay scales, Swedes fill jobs which Norwegians youths believe they are above.

Previous articles on The Foreigner have highlighted this issue in different ways. Multi-millionaire immigrant Tommy Sharif has stated his experience shows Swedes do not sit around. Extremely successful Norwegian businessperson Olav Thon has attacked his own countrymen’s poor work ethic.

Norway’s youths may have to think again.

“Young Norwegians and Swedes are very alike and compete for the same jobs, to a large degree. It becomes more difficult for Norwegian youths to find part-time and summer jobs when there’s a major increase in numbers of Swedes,” says Bernt Bratsberg, senior researcher at Norway’s Frisch Centre.

Their figures show some 1,300 Swedes between 17 and 25 were working in the ‘90s in Norway. It was about 28,000 in 2010.

“Competition has certainly increased”, explained staffing company Adecco’s Ander Øwre-Johnsen, “but I believe it’s good for Norwegian youths. It certainly isn’t harder than they can manage to match, though.”




Published on Monday, 7th October, 2013 at 10:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th October 2013 at 12:23.

This post has the following tags: norwaywork, foreignersnorway, norwayimmigration.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!