More political representatives argue for dual citizenship in Norway / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner More political representatives argue for dual citizenship in Norway. A dual national Socialist Left (SV) parliamentary candidate joins in the call for altering Norway’s citizenship laws. “We live in an international age where people move across borders far more than previously. There’s misunderstanding regarding the background for today's law and the arguments for requiring that people give up their citizenship to be allowed to be Norwegian,” Olivia Corso Salles told Dagsavisen, calling current legislation “old-fashioned”. Her statement comes in the wake of statements by both her Party and the Liberals they are in favour of dual nationality.

norwayimmigration, norwaydualnationality



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More political representatives argue for dual citizenship in Norway

Published on Tuesday, 6th August, 2013 at 20:43 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 7th August 2013 at 09:50.

A dual national Socialist Left (SV) parliamentary candidate joins in the call for altering Norway’s citizenship laws.



“We live in an international age where people move across borders far more than previously. There’s misunderstanding regarding the background for today's law and the arguments for requiring that people give up their citizenship to be allowed to be Norwegian,” Olivia Corso Salles told Dagsavisen, calling current legislation “old-fashioned”.

Her statement comes in the wake of statements by both her Party and the Liberals they are in favour of dual nationality.

The issue was first sparked by an Australian-Norwegian couple’s unsuccessful fight with immigration authority the UDI following officials’ move stripping two of their three daughters of their Norwegian citizenship, albeit retroactively.

So-called new Norwegian nationals must relinquish their old nationality within a year of gaining this but some, people for example refugees, can seek exemption from the rule in special circumstances.

The rule is also designed to reduce the ease of Norwegian nationals holding an additional nationality spying for other states’ advantage.

Ms Salles added that an immigrant retaining their original nationality neither makes them less loyal to Norway, nor any less Norwegian.

Countries such as Sweden, the UK, US, and Australia also do not have any legal barriers to dual nationality, according to her.

Moreover, UDI figures Dagsavisen asked for show 52 per cent of the 44,067 persons attaining Norwegian citizenship since January 2010 have kept their previous nationality. This is apparently the first time such an analysis has been compiled.

“This new overview from the UDI clearly shows that this it’s a law and regulations that need to be cleared up. We can’t have a system that is as inconsistent as it currently is,” concluded Ms Salles, also a Brazilian national.



Published on Tuesday, 6th August, 2013 at 20:43 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 7th August 2013 at 09:50.

This post has the following tags: norwayimmigration, norwaydualnationality.





  
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