Motorists encouraged to leave the car at home / News / The Foreigner

Motorists encouraged to leave the car at home. Council and bus company join forces. If you’ve seen people riding around Stavanger on painted bicycles recently, you probably haven’t been eating magic mushrooms. Tomorrow is the last day to make a difference under this year’s European Mobility Week. Watch the video below made by the European Commission (DG ENV) for the promotion of the European Mobility Week 2008, presenting mobility actions in Frankfurt and Bologna.Keeping the wheels moving

stavanger, council, kolumbus, bus, company, european, mobility, week, pollution, traffic, cars, health, environment



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Motorists encouraged to leave the car at home

Published on Monday, 21st September, 2009 at 13:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Council and bus company join forces.

Stop Here. No Entry
Stop Here. No Entry
Photo: Titanas/Flickr


If you’ve seen people riding around Stavanger on painted bicycles recently, you probably haven’t been eating magic mushrooms. Tomorrow is the last day to make a difference under this year’s European Mobility Week.

Watch the video below made by the European Commission (DG ENV) for the promotion of the European Mobility Week 2008, presenting mobility actions in Frankfurt and Bologna.

Keeping the wheels moving

The aim the week has been to increase people’s awareness of how to travel without using a car, and encourage them to use alternative methods to get around instead.

This has both environmental and health benefits, according to Richard Wigestrand in Stavanger council’s transport planning department

“It means less noise, exhaust fumes, soot, dust, and traffic,” he says.

Getting into a tizzy sitting in traffic isn’t good for your pulse rate, and neither is waiting for a bus or train that doesn’t come on time.

In the saddle

But public transport isn’t the only option. If you don’t mind the odd spot of bad weather, you could always try cycling.

The council has started a project called “free ride”. The 20 spruced up bicycles have been painted on by local artists, and you can borrow one free for as long as you wish.

“You don’t have to register for the scheme, but we trust people have a the good conscience to return them afterwards, though,” says Wigestrand.

An apple a day

And if you find a piece of paper underneath your car’s windscreen wipers later on today, it may not be a parking ticket.

Karianne Haarr Nedrebø, head of communications at Kolumbus, tells The Foreigner that the company will be reminding people to use the bus instead on the last day of the European-wide event.

“We’ll also be handing out giveaways and green apples on our buses tomorrow as a thank you,” she says.


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Published on Monday, 21st September, 2009 at 13:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: stavanger, council, kolumbus, bus, company, european, mobility, week, pollution, traffic, cars, health, environment.





  
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