National outbreak of E-Coli / News / The Foreigner

National outbreak of E-Coli. Four children infected. The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has sent out a national alert after four children under 10 from three regions have been infected by the E. coli bacteria. One child has since died from eating infected food. Preben Aavitsland from the Institute says that they haven’t yet identified which food-source the child ate, but it has been sold nationally.Symptoms The Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli strain (EHEC) – also known as 0157:H7 – can be fatal. Although most patients recover within 10 days, the infection can cause acute renal failure in both the elderly and young children.

e-coli, bacterium, meat, health, authority, public, serious



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

National outbreak of E-Coli

Published on Friday, 27th March, 2009 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 29th March 2009 at 22:05.

Four children infected.

Minced meat
Minced meat
Photo: aristotoo/Istockphotos


Three regions affected so far

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has sent out a national alert after four children under 10 from three regions have been infected by the E. coli bacteria. One child has since died from eating infected food. Preben Aavitsland from the Institute says that they haven’t yet identified which food-source the child ate, but it has been sold nationally.

Symptoms

The Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli strain (EHEC) – also known as 0157:H7 – can be fatal. Although most patients recover within 10 days, the infection can cause acute renal failure in both the elderly and young children.

The bacteria’s host is usually infected through food, water, or contact with infected animals. Symptoms include abdominal cramps and diarrhoea, and in some cases bloody diarrhoea. Fever and vomiting may also occur. People, and especially children with this type of diarrhoea, should seek medical advice as soon as possible, the Institute recommends.

Prevention

Good hygiene in the kitchen is important. The Food Safety Authority recommends people to always wash their hands, use clean kitchen tools and cloths, cook food thoroughly, keep cooked and raw food separated from each other, and store the food in your fridge at the temperature that is written on the packaging. This is particularly important in the case of fresh produce, as it is often exposed to temperatures that are too high on a daily basis. Check the temperature in your fridge: it should be around 4 degrees.

Measures

In co-operation with local health officials, the local Food Safety Authorities in the respective counties have taken samples from the patients’ leftover food and interviewed their parents. Samples of the food will be sent to the Veterinary Institute for analysis. Should E. coli be found, then the bacterial strain will be sent to the Institute of Public Health for DNA-analysis. The National Committee for Food-Bourne Diseases will be summoned to advise both the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and the Norwegian Food Safety Authority on the next stages of investigation. International networks will also be called upon as required. Until the source is found, the Institute of Public Health recommends people to cook food thoroughly.

Common

E. coli are intestinal bacteria that are normally found in large amounts in animals and humans. These bacteria are usually harmless, but certain strains can cause serious disease. One of these strains is the EHEC bacterium.

The strain is thought to be from the same group of bacteria as was discovered in the outbreak of 2006, and the four children are from Eid in Sogn og Fjordane, Tromsø in Troms and Malvik in south-Trøndelag.




Published on Friday, 27th March, 2009 at 13:16 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 29th March 2009 at 22:05.

This post has the following tags: e-coli, bacterium, meat, health, authority, public, serious.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!