NAV urges government raise benefits / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner NAV urges government raise benefits. Social benefit levels are so low in several parts of Norway that many clients do not have enough money to last a whole month, it is suggested. “It will be difficult for many to make changes in their life both if benefits are kept at a very low level, and one lives on them for a long time. Living in poverty leads to passivity, marginalization and isolation rather than increased activity,” NRK quotes from the recent internal report it has obtained access to. Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service (NAV) officials advise the government to increase the rates in line with wage growth.

norwegiansocialbenefit, norwegianlabourandwelfareexchangereport



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NAV urges government raise benefits

Published on Monday, 28th November, 2011 at 15:44 under the news category, by Ioana Dan.
Last Updated on 28th November 2011 at 22:45.

Social benefit levels are so low in several parts of Norway that many clients do not have enough money to last a whole month, it is suggested.



“It will be difficult for many to make changes in their life both if benefits are kept at a very low level, and one lives on them for a long time. Living in poverty leads to passivity, marginalization and isolation rather than increased activity,” NRK quotes from the recent internal report it has obtained access to.

Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service (NAV) officials advise the government to increase the rates in line with wage growth.

The report also states getting people off long-term benefits by placing them on training programs, or in jobs, is the Government’s main tool in the fight against poverty.

Unemployment levels declined in the last decade, but the number of Norwegians living on so-called persistently low income has remained constant, reports the broadcaster.

The scheme’s main aim is ensure people with no opportunities to earn wages can afford food and other necessities. It is meant as a temporary stopgap, “not designed as a long-term solution,” NAV officials write.

A reportedly “lukewarm” Minister of Labor, Hanne Bjurstrøm, says about the report’s suggestion to increase benefits rates, “There are different professional views here. I note what NAV says, but the most important thing for me is that good,individual evaluations are made around the country,” she says to NRK

“Basing social benefits at a level that gives the impression one can live off them over time results in losing necessary pressure created by the system requiring people to get of the scheme, either by way of another benefit type or by working.”

According to the broadcaster, NAV dismisses the minister’s concerns as “exaggerated”. Quoting recent research, officials say poverty is hereditary and not dependent upon the amount of financial assistance.

They suggest, “More emphasis should be placed on reinforcing and developing socio-professional work, and less on worrying about that receiving social benefits could become addictive.”

Oslo-based 57-year-old Joshua Jallow, who receives 5,500 kroner per month says, “You can’t afford food the last week, no matter how good you are at budgeting.”




Published on Monday, 28th November, 2011 at 15:44 under the news category, by Ioana Dan.
Last updated on 28th November 2011 at 22:45.

This post has the following tags: norwegiansocialbenefit, norwegianlabourandwelfareexchangereport.





  
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