New Breivik report ‘good’ but ‘changes nothing’ / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner New Breivik report ‘good’ but ‘changes nothing’. Terje Tørrisen and Agnar Aspaas have now declared that Anders Behring Breivik was sane when he killed 77 people last July. Experts and victims are divided. “Most people will have a much greater understanding of the new conclusion. It doesn’t necessarily mean it [the decision] is correct, but that fact that it has been made is good for the national soul,” Vårt Land reports Bergen-based crisis counsellor Atle Dyregrov as saying. Pointing out Norwegians tend to couple divergence to illness easily, he continues, “now they see that the court has to come to a decision based on what he has done, and this makes it easier to take account of events.”

breivikpsychiatricreport, breiviktrialoslo



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New Breivik report ‘good’ but ‘changes nothing’

Published on Wednesday, 11th April, 2012 at 10:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 11th April 2012 at 20:12.

Terje Tørrisen and Agnar Aspaas have now declared that Anders Behring Breivik was sane when he killed 77 people last July. Experts and victims are divided.



Reconciliation and powerlessness

“Most people will have a much greater understanding of the new conclusion. It doesn’t necessarily mean it [the decision] is correct, but that fact that it has been made is good for the national soul,” Vårt Land reports Bergen-based crisis counsellor Atle Dyregrov as saying.

Pointing out Norwegians tend to couple divergence to illness easily, he continues, “now they see that the court has to come to a decision based on what he has done, and this makes it easier to take account of events.”

Victims’ reactions have been mixed. Labour Youth’s (AUF) leader for Aust-Agder County Emma Martinovic, said to VG “What’s important for me is that the court sentences him to jail instead for what he did being concealed behind that he is mentally ill.”

“Hearing about the new psychiatric evaluation was interesting, but doesn't really make much difference,” Roald Linaker, whose 23-year-old son, Gunnar, was shot and killed on Utøya, tells Vårt Land.

His daughter Hanne, 18, survived, but times have been hard for the family. The loss of Gunnar still affects them very much.

“We’re also constantly reminded of this by what is happening at national level. We’re unable to set our own agenda, being instead part of a major national one.”

The new report is 310 pages long and states that Breivik is extremely egotistical, and is likely to be suffering from a dissocial and narcissistic personality disorder.

In a press release, Oslo District Court writes, “The main conclusion by the experts is that the defendant Anders Behring Breivik is considered NOT to be psychotic at the time of the act on 22nd July 2011. That means that he is assessed as competent at the time of the act.”

“The defendant does not have a serious mental illness involving significantly weakened capacity for realistic evaluation of his relations with the outside world, and did not act under severely impaired consciousness at the time of the act under prosecution. The defendant is not marginally mentally handicapped. There is a high risk of repetition of violence.”

Delight and regret

For his part, Breivik says he is pleased with the new assessment’s conclusions, according to his defence counsel Geir Lippestad.

In a letter recently sent to the Norwegian media by Breivik he states how he believes that the previous psychiatric experts Torgeir Husby and Synne Sørheim were affected strongly by his actions and that influenced their declaration.

Breivik also regrets he did not achieve more during his acts of terror which killed 77. Mr Lippestad advises people to steel themselves for what his client will say during testimony.

“He doesn’t want to just defend his actions, but also regrets that he did not go further,” he declared to VG yesterday.

According to the prosecution and Breivik’s defence counsels, new witnesses are likely to be called during the trial, which begins in just under a week

Whilst the defence says it is likely that these new witnesses will be those who have observed Breivik in prison, prosecutor Inga Bejer Engh told NRK it is not yet known who these will be.

Breivik could receive a prison sentence and not compulsory psychiatric treatment, as he has now been judged sane.




Published on Wednesday, 11th April, 2012 at 10:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 11th April 2012 at 20:12.

This post has the following tags: breivikpsychiatricreport, breiviktrialoslo.





  
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