New law to curb telephone salespeople / News / The Foreigner

New law to curb telephone salespeople. Law on marketing modified to help consumers. How often have you answered the phone to be greeted by a cheerful voice asking to speak to you, only to find that they want to sell you something? The Norwegian Consumer Ombudsman has now made it easier for you to put the phone down. The new law took effect on Monday and is designed to give better protection for consumers against unwanted telephone sales calls. Although it has been possible to bar your details from being given out to salespeople in a registry (Reservasjonsregisteret) held by the Brønnøysund Register Authority since 2001, there have been a growing number of companies that ignore this and ring people anyway.Requirements strengthened

telephone, salespeople, telesales, norwegian, ombudsman, law, registry



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New law to curb telephone salespeople

Published on Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009 at 23:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Law on marketing modified to help consumers.

Isolated hand and phone
Isolated hand and phone
Photo: Sherrie Smith/Shutterstock Images


How often have you answered the phone to be greeted by a cheerful voice asking to speak to you, only to find that they want to sell you something? The Norwegian Consumer Ombudsman has now made it easier for you to put the phone down.

The new law took effect on Monday and is designed to give better protection for consumers against unwanted telephone sales calls. Although it has been possible to bar your details from being given out to salespeople in a registry (Reservasjonsregisteret) held by the Brønnøysund Register Authority since 2001, there have been a growing number of companies that ignore this and ring people anyway.

Requirements strengthened

Now consumers can add their telephone numbers directly to this register themselves which, according to the ombudsman, will make it easier to stop this happening.

Before the new law took effect, telesales companies had to update their registers once every three months. Now they are legally bound to check their telephone lists once a month, and there will be consequences should they not abide by the new law.

“Should you be called by telephone salespeople, despite having put yourself on the register, you can now complain to the ombudsman directly. We will then take the matter up with the company concerned” says Bjørn Erik Thon at the ombudsman.

Written consent

There is also good news for the consumers who receive goods that they never ordered. The companies are now obliged to send out written information – via SMS, email, or in the post – and to receive your consent in writing before the contract is binding. Previously, they claimed that a verbal agreement over the phone was sufficient. Should you not respond, the contract is annulled. Newspaper subscriptions and voluntary organisations are exempt from this rule.

Of course if you don’t speak Norwegian, you are better off anyway.



Published on Tuesday, 2nd June, 2009 at 23:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: telephone, salespeople, telesales, norwegian, ombudsman, law, registry.





  
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