New Norway Viking settlement discovered / News / The Foreigner

New Norway Viking settlement discovered. Experts have found a hitherto unknown Viking area with the aid of modern science and no shovels, reports say. Using a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and magnetometer, surveys have revealed the settlement in Sandefjord in Gokstadhaugen, eastern Norway, has 15 buildings, an 80-metre long street and a port. Archaeologists from Oslo’s Museum of Cultural History and the Norwegian Institute for Cultural heritage Research (NIKU) were among those that made the discovery, in cooperation with Vestfold County.

gokstadvikingdiscovery, markettowngokstadvalley, norwayvikings



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New Norway Viking settlement discovered

Published on Tuesday, 13th March, 2012 at 10:56 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Experts have found a hitherto unknown Viking area with the aid of modern science and no shovels, reports say.

Scientists using a magnetometer in Gokstad
Gokstad's grave mound can be seen in the backgroundScientists using a magnetometer in Gokstad
Photo: Norwegian Institute for Cultural heritage


Using a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and magnetometer, surveys have revealed the settlement in Sandefjord in Gokstadhaugen, eastern Norway, has 15 buildings, an 80-metre long street and a port.

Archaeologists from Oslo’s Museum of Cultural History and the Norwegian Institute for Cultural heritage Research (NIKU) were among those that made the discovery, in cooperation with Vestfold County.

Work in Gokstadhaugen began in 2011 with drilling there, as well as experts making geophysical surveys from the sea a northwards in what is called Gokstad Valley (Gokstaddalen).

NIKU’s Knut Paashe told Aftenposten, “There is no doubt that we have encountered a market town-like structure from the Viking age with houses and streets.”

Further investigations of the area can now take place following archaeologists’ confirmation a Viking settlement is present.

“We have identified a lot using technology. It helps us to find the location of the interesting places to dig. This means we never have to spend lots of time and money to dig where there is nothing,” county archaeologist Terje Gansum said to NRK.

Last month, NTNU Museum of Natural History and Archaeology personnel discovered an H sword in Melhus as a result of construction work in the area.




Published on Tuesday, 13th March, 2012 at 10:56 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: gokstadvikingdiscovery, markettowngokstadvalley, norwayvikings.





  
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