New Norway website to tackle extremism / News / The Foreigner

New Norway website to tackle extremism. Norwegian Minister of Justice Grete Faremo has launched a site website designed to help people spot the signs of extremism. The website radikalisering.no is aimed, along with other projects, at stopping those with extremist views before they can resort to violence. Minister Faremo participated at a conference today, which dealt with preventing extremism. People who addressed gathered delegates were journalists, Police Security Service (PST) representatives, researchers in the army, police academy professors, and officials from the Ministry of Justice.

gretefaremo, extremismnorway



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New Norway website to tackle extremism

Published on Tuesday, 6th December, 2011 at 21:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

Norwegian Minister of Justice Grete Faremo has launched a site website designed to help people spot the signs of extremism.

Grete Faremo
Grete Faremo
Photo: Taral Jansen/Forsvaret


The website radikalisering.no is aimed, along with other projects, at stopping those with extremist views before they can resort to violence.

Minister Faremo participated at a conference today, which dealt with preventing extremism. People who addressed gathered delegates were journalists, Police Security Service (PST) representatives, researchers in the army, police academy professors, and officials from the Ministry of Justice.

“Most of this [extremism] takes place online. You find it contained in debates, Facebook, and their own websites, such as blogs and similar forums. The extremist anti-jihadist environment is particularly active on the Internet,” author Øyvind Strømmen, who released a book on the subject recently, says to NRK.

“There are some organisations, such as the Norwegian Defence League, that has tried to make its voice heard in public, but the largest groups can be found online.”

According to Geir Espen Fossum, head of section at the PST, “we believe we have seen an increase in threats [directed against officials] and critical statements promoted on the Internet following July 22nd.

“[...] these have become more serious and are characterised by stronger wording and harsher language. We assume and consider them to be the direct result of the acts of terror,” he tells Aftenposten.

Mr Fossum maintains the PST still considers people and environments connected to extreme Islam who pose the greatest threat to Norway.

Radikalisering.no will allow people to contact the police if they feel that someone is in danger of becoming radicalised. Most of it is yet to be translated into English.



Published on Tuesday, 6th December, 2011 at 21:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: gretefaremo, extremismnorway.





  
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