‘No English-language Ibsen in summer embarrassing,’ says Norway tourism top / News / The Foreigner

‘No English-language Ibsen in summer embarrassing,’ says Norway tourism top. The Ministry of Culture has put aside NOK 1.8 million in an attempt to make Norwegian culture accessible to more tourists, but Norwegian is an enemy of the people. “It’s embarrassing it’s not possible to experience Ibsen in English in Norway in summer, it should be maneagable,” Hilde Charlotte Solheim, Enterprise Federation of Norway tourism and culture director, told Aftenposten, citing this season’s Munch exhibition. Norway’s prices, service-levels, lack of choice, and hotel standards have had a tendency to confuse or put foreign visitors off. Some find Norwegians aloof, an Oslo-based academic problematises their missing small-talk abilities.

norwayculture, tourismnorway



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‘No English-language Ibsen in summer embarrassing,’ says Norway tourism top

Published on Wednesday, 3rd July, 2013 at 16:37 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

The Ministry of Culture has put aside NOK 1.8 million in an attempt to make Norwegian culture accessible to more tourists, but Norwegian is an enemy of the people.

Henrik Ibsen (ca. 1898)
Henrik Ibsen (ca. 1898)
Photo: National Library of Norway/Flickr


“It’s embarrassing it’s not possible to experience Ibsen in English in Norway in summer, it should be maneagable,” Hilde Charlotte Solheim, Enterprise Federation of Norway tourism and culture director, told Aftenposten, citing this season’s Munch exhibition.

Norway’s prices, service-levels, lack of choice, and hotel standards have had a tendency to confuse or put foreign visitors off. Some find Norwegians aloof, an Oslo-based academic problematises their missing small-talk abilities.

“One major problem with the Norwegian tourism industry is that we don’t package basic services such as transportation, accommodation, and meals together with the reason for why tourists come here.”

She added that Norway’s tourism and culture sectors must be better at cooperating on an equal footing to attract foreign visitors and mutually benefit from income.

According to her, tourists often come to experience Norway’s nature, “but 8 of 10 also avail themselves of what’s on offer on the cultural front whilst here.”

Minister of Culture Hadia Tajik informed the paper their financial allocation move is designed to promote idea growth on how to do this.

Meanwhile, Ibsen Museum director Erik Henning Edvardsen explained that tours are offered in English throughout the summer, but plays performed in the language often see varying success due to inconsistent spectator numbers.

“There have been attempts made at this, but no one has succeeded. Maybe it’s got something to do with advertising, the difficulty of catching the attention of tourists in a city like Oslo.”



Published on Wednesday, 3rd July, 2013 at 16:37 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: norwayculture, tourismnorway.





  
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