No norsk, please, we’re Statoil / News / The Foreigner

No norsk, please, we’re Statoil. Company requires correspondence in English to save money. Norwegian is out, as far as Statoil and their subcontractors are concerned. In a cost-cutting move, the Norwegian state-owned company now wants correspondence in English only. “In order to reduce the costs of maintaining the use of two parallel languages in Norway, Statoil has an ambition to increase the use of English language – both in contracts and incoming invoices. Norwegian language will however still be used for contracts where this is deemed necessary,” Bergens Tidende reports the letter as reading.No comprendo

statoil, english, norwegian, documents, oil, invoices, contracts, money-saving, budgets



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No norsk, please, we’re Statoil

Published on Sunday, 25th April, 2010 at 13:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 25th April 2010 at 22:08.

Company requires correspondence in English to save money.

Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
Photo: Muffet/Flickr


Breadline, not pipeline

Norwegian is out, as far as Statoil and their subcontractors are concerned. In a cost-cutting move, the Norwegian state-owned company now wants correspondence in English only.

“In order to reduce the costs of maintaining the use of two parallel languages in Norway, Statoil has an ambition to increase the use of English language – both in contracts and incoming invoices. Norwegian language will however still be used for contracts where this is deemed necessary,” Bergens Tidende reports the letter as reading.

No comprendo

There were various reactions from several of the companies the paper spoke to.

“Issuing invoices in English isn’t a problem as we also have foreign clients,” Jan Dypedal, Mongstad Elektro, industri og energy AS’ general manager tells the paper.

But Øystein Hope, general manager of Magne Hope AS contractors (entreprenørforretning), says Statoil’s intentions leave him cold. He fears it will lead to unnecessary misunderstandings.

“I don’t really think much of it. We live in Norway, and I believe shoving responsibility for this over to the subcontractors is unnecessary. It’s an annoyance for us, it creates extra work. We’ve a perfectly good system that has always functioned in the past, even if some bills need more explanation.”

A challenge

Dag F. Simonsen, senior advisor at Språkrådet, the state’s professional body regarding the Norwegian language, is also critical.

He says he believes it could put a strain on smaller companies’ budgets because they’ll have to foot the bill to get documents translated.

However, Lars Bjelvin, Statoil’s vice-president of communications, argues using English is commonplace because of the company’s heavy involvement in the international oil industry.

“It’s therefore natural for us to encourage the use of English, although we acknowledge this may be irregular for some,” he says.



Published on Sunday, 25th April, 2010 at 13:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 25th April 2010 at 22:08.

This post has the following tags: statoil, english, norwegian, documents, oil, invoices, contracts, money-saving, budgets.





  
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