Nobel Medicine Prize to Norwegians, Briton / News / The Foreigner

Nobel Medicine Prize to Norwegians, Briton. UPDATED: Norway’s Edward and May-Britt Moser awarded this year’s Prize in Medicine or Physiology together with London-based John O’Keefe. All three won for their discoveries of cells in mammals’ brains that prevent them getting lost, directing them to places. These could be considered as being the physiological precursor to a GPS, orientating ourselves in space.

nobel, medicine, physiology



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Nobel Medicine Prize to Norwegians, Briton

Published on Monday, 6th October, 2014 at 12:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 7th October 2014 at 09:00.

UPDATED: Norway’s Edward and May-Britt Moser awarded this year’s Prize in Medicine or Physiology together with London-based John O’Keefe.

May-Britt and Edvard Moser
The couple pictured in August 2010.May-Britt and Edvard Moser
Photo: Kavli Institute,NTNU/Wikimedia Commons


All three won for their discoveries of cells in mammals’ brains that prevent them getting lost, directing them to places.

These could be considered as being the physiological precursor to a GPS, orientating ourselves in space.

Mr O’Keefe discovered the first component of this positioning system in 1971. He found that there was a type of nerve cell in an area of the brain called the hippocampus.

The hippocampus is named due its resemblance to the seahorse, and comprises the two Greek words hippos ("horse"), and kampos ("sea monster").

John O'Keefe
John O'Keefe
Per Henning/NTNU/Flickr
This area was always activated when a rat was at a certain place in a room. Other nerve cells were activated when the small mammal was located in other places.

Scientist Mr O’Keefe concluded that a map of the room was formed by these “place cells”.

Almost 30 years later in 2005, Norwegians Edward and May-Britt Moser discovered another of the essential components of the brain’s positioning system, called the “grid cells”.

This additional type of nerve cell allow for precise positioning and path-finding because they generate

Further research by both scientists – who are senior staff at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at Trondheim’s Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) – demonstrated how these place and grid cells allowed mammals to determine position and navigate.

“The discoveries of John O´Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser have solved a problem that has occupied philosophers and scientists for centuries – how does the brain create a map of the space surrounding us and how can we navigate our way through a complex environment?” The Nobel Assembly at Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet say in a statement.



Published on Monday, 6th October, 2014 at 12:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 7th October 2014 at 09:00.

This post has the following tags: nobel, medicine, physiology.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!