Nobel Peace Prize 2014 winners: a short profile / News / The Foreigner

Nobel Peace Prize 2014 winners: a short profile. Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai receive the Nobel Peace Prize 2014, Wednesday. It is awarded for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and the right for all children to have an education. 17-year-old Malala, who arrived at Oslo Gardermoen Airport on Monday evening, was shot in the head on a school bus by a Taliban gunman back in 2012.

nobelpeaceprize, oslo, norway



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Nobel Peace Prize 2014 winners: a short profile

Published on Wednesday, 10th December, 2014 at 07:25 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 10th December 2014 at 22:32.

Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai receive the Nobel Peace Prize 2014, Wednesday.

Oslo City Hall
The annual Nobel Peace Prize ceremony takes place here in downtown Oslo.Oslo City Hall
Photo: Ilan Kelman


It is awarded for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and the right for all children to have an education.

17-year-old Malala, who arrived at Oslo Gardermoen Airport on Monday evening, was shot in the head on a school bus by a Taliban gunman back in 2012.

The action was in response to her campaign that girls deserve the right to an education.

The Taliban issued a death threat against Malala when she was 14 as her public profile began to gain interest.

She gave a speech in Peshawar in September 2008 entitled “How dare the Taliban take away my basic right to education?”

In 2009, Malala began blogging for the BBC about living with the Taliban’s threats to her right of an education.

She wrote disguised under the name of Gul Makai, but her identity was revealed in December that year.

Her continuing activism resulted in a nomination for the International Children’s Peace Prize in 2011, and she was awarded Pakistan’s National Youth Peace Prize in the same year.

After the shooting carried out by a Taliban gunman in October 2012, Malala was left in critical condition and was flown to a military hospital, where part of her skull was removed before she was transferred to England.

Known everywhere as Malala, the youngest Nobel Prize winner did not travel alone to Norway: five other teenage activists from Pakistan, Syria and Nigeria will accompany her.

They include Shazia Ramzan (16), Kainat Riaz (17), and Amina Yusuf (17).

Her school uniform worn on the day of the shooting is displayed at the Nobel Peace Centre in Norway.

“My school uniform is very important to me. [...] The day I was attacked I was wearing this uniform. I was fighting for my right to go to school,” Malala said during a statement.

60-year-old Kailash Satyarhi will receive the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Malala. He has worked towards saving children from slave labour for 35 years.

Establishing the child rights group ‘Bachpan Backao’ (‘Save the Childhood Movement’), Satyarhi has also worked on documentaries on modern-day slavery in Assam.

He has explained the dangers of his work through his work with Guardian Films, leading a raid to rescue a girl from trafficking in Delhi.

“In my own case I have my broken leg and my broken head and my broken back and my broken shoulder, so different parts of my body have been broken while I was trying to rescue children,” he has said.

Satyarthi gave up his career as an engineer in his 20’s to focus full-heartedly on working as a child rights activist, and aid children in India who at the time were not protected by the law from exploitation.

He and his team have helped to rescue more than 80,000 children in India from slavery and child labour.

“This is not an honour for me alone. I strongly feel this is an honour for all the children in the world,” he told NRK.

Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjørn Jagland, will present the laureates with the Prize at the traditional ceremony in Oslo City Hall at 1pm local time today.




Published on Wednesday, 10th December, 2014 at 07:25 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 10th December 2014 at 22:32.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprize, oslo, norway.





  
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