Nobel Peace Prize: ‘Women hold up half of the sky’ / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Nobel Peace Prize: ‘Women hold up half of the sky’. This Year's Nobel Peace Prize speeches encouraged women around the world to rise up and make demands. Nobel Committee Leader Torbjørn Jagland started his opening address saying that, “Investing in women is an investment in family” and believing that women must have the same opportunities as men, in all levels of the society. He also stated that there must be a future without violence and war, even if there are children and women in African countries who are still abused and killed in our time.

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Nobel Peace Prize: ‘Women hold up half of the sky’

Published on Saturday, 10th December, 2011 at 16:04 under the news category, by Ioana Dan.

This Year's Nobel Peace Prize speeches encouraged women around the world to rise up and make demands.



Nobel Committee Leader Torbjørn Jagland started his opening address saying that, “Investing in women is an investment in family” and believing that women must have the same opportunities as men, in all levels of the society.

He also stated that there must be a future without violence and war, even if there are children and women in African countries who are still abused and killed in our time.

“Men and women experience war differently. There are men who often start the war, while women and children often become victims. Rape has become part of the war’s tactics; this is a crime against humanity.”

Women have to break for their role as victims, even if their situation is difficult in many parts of the world and men take advantage of their social status.  Access to education for women remains one of the most important changes that must take place in African countries, he declared.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the 73-year-old President of Liberia, opened her speech by saying that she receives the Nobel Peace Prize with all humility on behalf of all women in the world who have fought for peace.

She also addressed her deepest sympathy to the Norwegian Royal Family and victims of the 22 July attack, saying that the Norwegian people have shown a lot of openness, integrity and justice.

Sirleaf believes in the importance of quality education for both women and men, because women in many parts of the globe are being discouraged if they want to learn and follow an education.

This should be only the beginning, she believes. Many women are still beaten and abused in places where leadership qualities are for only one gender.

“Today women and men worldwide have found the courage to say "no more” loudly and firmly in thousands languages,” said Sirleaf.

Women must fight for their rights in education, social standard and access into society. She encouraged women worldwide not to be “afraid to stick to peace, even if your voice is small. My sisters, my daughters, my friends – find your voice. Find your voice, raise you voice, let your voice be a voice of freedom.”

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf ended her speech by saying that this “must not be a passing historic event”, and that the fight for human rights must continue.

Leymah Gbowee, 39, from Liberia began by saying how she and other women from Liberia were able to create the women's movement against the long-running civil war in Liberia in 2003, having only a small space to operate and just 10 US dollars.

The Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace’s campaign helped put an end the Liberian civil war in the same year

She continued, dedicating this Nobel Prize to the women of Zimbabwe, Congo, Ghana, Afghanistan, and to the women who used to be the silent victims of men’s power, but no more.

“This prize has come as a time when ordinary mothers don’t ask for peace, but demand peace”, said Leymah Gbowee.

The youngest of the three prizewinners, Tawakkul Karman, just 31 years old, said that she speaks on behalf of young people who fight for peace.

“I have always believed that it is possible to fight against violence without using violent means,” said Karman

She believes that the human civilization is comprised of both men's and women's efforts and that young people who fight against injustice are witness to new and better times.

“Our revolution is youthful, peaceful, and the people have placed themselves around it,” said Tawakkul Karman.

Concluding her speech, she thanked all the women who have made it possible for her to be standing on the podium and to receive this Nobel Peace Prize.



Published on Saturday, 10th December, 2011 at 16:04 under the news category, by Ioana Dan.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprizeawardceremony2011, nobelpeaceprizespeeches.





  
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