Nobel Physics Prize 2014 rewards advances in light / News / The Foreigner

Nobel Physics Prize 2014 rewards advances in light. This year’s Nobel Physics Prize winners are Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano from Japan and Japanese-American Shuji Nakamura. The Prize was awarded to them for their invention of the energy efficient blue-light emitting diode (LED). This technology has been out of reach for mankind for three decades. However, the three physicists have succeeded where everyone else has failed, says The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

nobel, physics, led, light



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Nobel Physics Prize 2014 rewards advances in light

Published on Tuesday, 7th October, 2014 at 21:10 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.

This year’s Nobel Physics Prize winners are Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano from Japan and Japanese-American Shuji Nakamura.

Light signal
A safety-oriented type of LED sign seen along the side of roads.Light signal
Photo: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences


The Prize was awarded to them for their invention of the energy efficient blue-light emitting diode (LED).

This technology has been out of reach for mankind for three decades. However, the three physicists have succeeded where everyone else has failed, says The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

The blue-light emitting diode allows for energy efficient and environmental friendly white lighting because there is no mercury in them.

Blue LEDs are found everywhere nowadays, used in smartphones, for instance. Therefore, the Nobel Committee deemed it as having the greatest benefit to mankind because the technology is so widely used.

Red and green diodes have been around for a long time. However, the creation of white lamps was impossible without the addition of blue ones. 

The first blue LED was created in the 1990s. The invention is less than 20 years old, but its use is already widespread.

LED’s also last longer than other lighting alternatives. LED lights can last 100,000 hours, whereas fluorescent ones only last for 10,000 hours. 

“With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources,” The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences press release reads.

Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura will be sharing a prize of SEK 8 million.



Published on Tuesday, 7th October, 2014 at 21:10 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.

This post has the following tags: nobel, physics, led, light.





  
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