Nordic health officials concerned about fruit and vegetable imports / News / The Foreigner

Nordic health officials concerned about fruit and vegetable imports. Experts in Nordic countries say they expect a future increase in food-related outbreaks of illness. According to the “Nordic Expert Survey on Future Food-borne and Waterborne Outbreaks” survey (external link), which includes Norwegian Food Safety Authority (FSA) participation, this will rise to between 10 and 20 percent in the next eight years. The poll compared 2011-2020 with 2001-2010. Scientists believe raw fruit and vegetables imports will be mainly to blame. Swedish respondents answered, for example, that herbs and spices were there main concern, whilst it was fish in Finland.

norwayfoodsafety, fruitandvegetablesnorway, norwayfoodimports



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Nordic health officials concerned about fruit and vegetable imports

Published on Thursday, 18th October, 2012 at 13:43 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Experts in Nordic countries say they expect a future increase in food-related outbreaks of illness.

Fruit and veg:Turnham Green (illus. ph.)
Fruit and veg:Turnham Green (illus. ph.)
Photo: Pam Brophy/Creative Commons Licence


According to the “Nordic Expert Survey on Future Food-borne and Waterborne Outbreaks” survey (external link), which includes Norwegian Food Safety Authority (FSA) participation, this will rise to between 10 and 20 percent in the next eight years. The poll compared 2011-2020 with 2001-2010.

Scientists believe raw fruit and vegetables imports will be mainly to blame. Swedish respondents answered, for example, that herbs and spices were there main concern, whilst it was fish in Finland.

This was “perhaps due a larger share of imported fish products,” the experts write.

248 food experts received the poll, with 55.3%, 46.6%, and 41.2% answering in Finland, Sweden, and Denmark, respectively.

39.5% answered in Norway, [but] “the Norwegian respondents had longer experience of risk assessment than risk management, unlike the other nationalities. The opposite tendency applied for the Finnish respondents.”

At the same time, Norwegian experts had the lowest number of years’ experience of risk analysis within management (4.9), while Finnish experts came top with 12.9 years.

In response to the question, “Which agents of food-borne diseases are likely to contribute to a significant increase in the number of outbreaks in your country during 2011-2020 compared with 2001-2010?” Norwegian experts answered mycotoxins (fungus and moulds) were more often likely, whereas viruses were less likely.

Norway’s Food Safety Authority is a member of EFSA’s (European Food Safety Authority) own Emerging Risk Unit panel.

“The Nordic members of the Emerging Risk Unit formed a joint study to determine what experts in food safety hazards expect can occur regarding food-borne illness outbreaks in the future,” FSA senior advisor Åse Fulke says in a statement.

“Expectations vary according to experience, education, and nationality, but the trend shows that experts believe imported foods, especially raw vegetable products, would be the most likely source of food-borne infection.”



Published on Thursday, 18th October, 2012 at 13:43 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayfoodsafety, fruitandvegetablesnorway, norwayfoodimports.





  
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