Northern Norway leaves Tesla flat / News / The Foreigner

Northern Norway leaves Tesla flat. Drivers of the luxury US car could reach the end of the road due to no public fast-charging stations north of Tromsø. Northern Norway is famous for things like reindeer sledding, the Northern Lights, and the Midnight Sun. The Sun has by far from set on Tesla top Elon Musk, though. His Norway car sales figures are electric, certainly in the south. Waiting at the wayside But motorists hoping for a longer, picturesque journey ‘up north’ will run out of juice if hoping to travel the some 800 kilometres (about 497 miles) between Tromsø in Troms County and Finnmark County’s Kirkenes or vice versa.

electriccars, norway



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Northern Norway leaves Tesla flat

Published on Wednesday, 9th April, 2014 at 20:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 13th June 2017 at 17:03.

Drivers of the luxury US car could reach the end of the road due to no public fast-charging stations north of Tromsø.

Kirkenes after sunset
The view is lovely, if you're not sitting by the side of the road with your electric vehicle's flat battery, that is.Kirkenes after sunset
Photo: Michael Clarke/Flickr


Northern Norway is famous for things like reindeer sledding, the Northern Lights, and the Midnight Sun. The Sun has by far from set on Tesla top Elon Musk, though. His Norway car sales figures are electric, certainly in the south.

Waiting at the wayside

But motorists hoping for a longer, picturesque journey ‘up north’ will run out of juice if hoping to travel the some 800 kilometres (about 497 miles) between Tromsø in Troms County and Finnmark County’s Kirkenes or vice versa.

There are several electric cars on the market at the moment, and Teslas have the largest battery capacity of all the current ones – 482 km/300 miles at 88.5 km/h 55 mph under normal driving, the manufacturer says.

Nevertheless, the Norwegian government’s renewables company Transnova, responsible for building the charging station infrastructure, has not included northern Norway’s Finnmark.

“It’s not part of our current proposal strategy for Norway’s charging infrastructure up to end 2016,” senior advisor Tom Norbech tells The Foreigner.

Why not?                     

“It’s Minister of Transport Ketil Solvik-Olsen who has the final word on this one, but there are less than 40 EVs up there at the moment and the population’s sparse. We need 28 quick chargers to cover the some 70,000-75,000 people.”

“We have now proposed the Ministry allocate NOK 100m (some USD 16.8m) for 325 charging stations for the 30-largest urban areas, NOK 35m (about 5.9m) for 60 stations for the transport corridors outside the cities all the way up to Tromsø, and NOK 15m (roughly USD 2.5m) on EV car-sharing,” says Mr Norbech.

Transnova is spending NOK 20m (about USD 5m) on the charging station network, transport corridors, and EV car-sharing scheme this year.

No need to wait

“Of course, Tesla can build their own charging stations,” explains Petter Haugneland, the Norwegian Electric Vehicle Association’s communications manager, “but this will be if they can make money on them, and they are practically possible.”

“Moreover, the EVs are mainly in the cities. Neither the climate nor the distance make that far north the best environment for these vehicles.”

Help for residents and tourists when southwest of Kirkenes, not far from the Norway’s borders with Finland and Sweden, is slight too, according to Mr Haugneland.

“There are few charging stations in Finland, even fewer in Sweden. I doubt these countries are as far advanced as Norway is when it comes to EVs,” he says.

Finland’s industry consumes high amounts of power. The country’s climate also increases the need for electricity for heating households, boilers, and saunas.

The International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Implementation Agreement (IA-HEV) states the existing transmission system requires little adaptation to provide the electricity needed to charge up to 500,000 EVs.

“There are very few charging stations targeted for electric cars. As of the end of 2010, the rough amounts are 20–30 slow charging stations (220V/16A), with a few fast charging stations (400V/250A). The number of specific charging stations will increase in coming years due to new demonstration projects bringing up to 500 electric cars into the Helsinki area,” they state.

181 plug-ins had been sold in Finland at the end of 2013 (latest available figures), just two more than the year before. Volvo’s V60 (Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV)), Toyota’s Prius (EV), and Nissan’s Leaf (EV) occupied the first three places, with 66, 45, and 41, respectively. Tesla had sold two of its Model S’.

No stopping Scandinavians?

Meanwhile, EV sales for Sweden in January were 136. Mitsubishi’s Outlander (PHEV), VW’s e-Up! (EV), and Nissan’s Leaf (EV) were the top three selling cars, with 35, 23, and 15, respectively. One Tesla Model S had been sold.

The IEA’s IA-HEV report states that Sweden’s Energy Agency published a Plug-In and Electric Vehicles report in 2009. Its main conclusion then was to “urge the government to move forward with a strategy for the research, development, and deployment of test fleets of electrical vehicles.” Gothenburg aimed to evaluate 500 charging stations in an urban environment.

Latest information from the Agency, its outlook for 2013 regarding success factors for hybrid and electric vehicle deployment, can be found here (external link).

Norway’s January 2014 EV sales were the clear leader, though, with 1,188. Top three were Nissan’s Leaf (650), VW’s e-Up! (175), and Tesla’s Model S (132).

Tesla sped past the competition in March this year, selling 2,056 Model S’. Sales of Nissan’s Leaf and VW’s e-Up! were 1,559 and 719, respectively. BMW’s i3 model saw sales of 646 cars.

What would you advise people with range anxiety do?

“Coming hybrid plug-ins will be perfect for longer journeys in northern Norway, as the fuel-driven engine can take over from the electric one,” Petter Haugneland of the Norwegian Electric Vehicle Association tells The Foreigner.

“Most people may not undertake long trips every day, but it’s wise to plan well ahead and have a Plan B,” he concludes.

Current tax breaks for EV owners in Norway will end when 50,000 electric cars are on the road or in 2017, whichever comes first.




Published on Wednesday, 9th April, 2014 at 20:33 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 13th June 2017 at 17:03.

This post has the following tags: electriccars, norway.





  
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