Norvège 387 points / News / The Foreigner

Norvège 387 points. Alexander Rybak wins 2009 Eurovision song contest and sets new points record. This year’s Eurovision song contest is now over, and those living abroad who wish to visit Norway to see next year’s final can probably start making their plans after the decision of where it is going to be held has been made. Don’t hold your breath; Norway’s social democratic process takes a long time to grind through its machinations before anything is announced. So much for the fairytale landscape, but “hats off, Gentlemen” to the young Norwegian. Rybak, whose roots are in Belarus, bowed his way past Iceland, who trailed behind in second place by 169 points. If you’ve read Heidi Stephens’ blog on guardian.co.uk, the last sentence should read that he eye-browed his way past Iceland.

eurovision, song, contest, fairytale, alexander, rybak, norway, points, norwegian, final



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Norvège 387 points

Published on Sunday, 17th May, 2009 at 21:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Alexander Rybak wins 2009 Eurovision song contest and sets new points record.

Final: Green Room Image 6
Final: Green Room Image 6
Photo: Indrek Galetin/EBU


This year’s Eurovision song contest is now over, and those living abroad who wish to visit Norway to see next year’s final can probably start making their plans after the decision of where it is going to be held has been made. Don’t hold your breath; Norway’s social democratic process takes a long time to grind through its machinations before anything is announced. So much for the fairytale landscape, but “hats off, Gentlemen” to the young Norwegian.

Rybak, whose roots are in Belarus, bowed his way past Iceland, who trailed behind in second place by 169 points. If you’ve read Heidi Stephens’ blog on guardian.co.uk, the last sentence should read that he eye-browed his way past Iceland.

“He's like a little Dickensian schoolboy with a violin and bonkers eyebrows, and it's all very theatrical, with backing dancers in braces doing gymnastics” writes Stephens.

The Norwegian ambassador in Moscow, Knut Hauge was more enthusiastic:

“I sat in the auditorium and was spellbound. Maybe you can hear this from the condition of my voice; it doesn’t become like this for no reason. In the beginning we cheered each time Norway got points, but after a while we had to calm down and limit ourselves to the twelve-pointers” he told Stavanger Aftenblad,

and diplomatic:

“It’s really marvellous to see how popular he is here because of his heritage too. At the same time he is an important bridge-builder between Norway and this entire region. Both Rybak’s character and background will bring these two countries closer together. The first person to notice this will be the prime-minister Jens Stoltenberg, when he comes to Moscow on Tuesday.”

Journalist Christina Torsøe is more sober in her comments to Aftenbladet.

“Alexander, who turned 23 three days before the final, warmed up (with a burger) in McDonalds. This can’t have been completely wrong; because his energy, voice, and presence during the grand final were impeccable...Alexander Rybak received the most applause from the journalists in the pressroom of the Olympisky Arena in Moscow. NRK and the other Norwegian journalists permitted themselves to get carried away, and stood up and waved the flag, singing.”

And because there are no papers on Norwegian National Day, the Swedes decided to “help” the Norwegians celebrate their victory, by distributing copies of the Swedish paper “Expressen” that were flown over specially, outside the palace.

Coming so far behind must be a bit of a disappointment to Iceland, though. First their economy collapses and Gordon Brown’s government seized their assets under British anti-terror laws, then the voters turned them down in favour of Norway.

Still, there’s probably no bad blood between the two countries, as they have appointed a Norwegian to save their economy, and several of the islanders have found jobs here. Unfortunately, this leaves the island with many old geysers.

Further pictures from the final can be found here.



Published on Sunday, 17th May, 2009 at 21:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: eurovision, song, contest, fairytale, alexander, rybak, norway, points, norwegian, final.





  
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