Norway 22 July terror attack victim’s ideals live on / News / The Foreigner

Norway 22 July terror attack victim’s ideals live on. LONDON: A foundation helping Africans has been set up in Norwegian Tore Eikeland’s name. The leader of Hordaland County AUF and member of European Youth of Norway died on the Island of Utøya in 2011. 21-year-old Tore believed in helping people in a practical and selfless way, and had very strong opinions on the basic right to a decent life. He had always been involved in the political scene and had a future in politics ahead of him. The young man had always campaigned for sustainable development, equality, and improved democracy in disadvantaged areas worldwide.

utoya, 22july, norway, terror, government



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Norway 22 July terror attack victim’s ideals live on

Published on Friday, 1st August, 2014 at 22:47 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last Updated on 1st August 2014 at 22:59.

LONDON: A foundation helping Africans has been set up in Norwegian Tore Eikeland’s name. The leader of Hordaland County AUF and member of European Youth of Norway died on the Island of Utøya in 2011.

Tore Eikeland
Tore Eikeland pictured before his passing. The young man had a career in politics ahead of him.Tore Eikeland
Photo: The Tore Eikeland Foundation


21-year-old Tore believed in helping people in a practical and selfless way, and had very strong opinions on the basic right to a decent life. He had always been involved in the political scene and had a future in politics ahead of him.

The young man had always campaigned for sustainable development, equality, and improved democracy in disadvantaged areas worldwide.

It is these values that the Tore Eikeland Foundation explains they aim to attain. They also state they intend to improve the lives of those living in rural underprivileged communities, especially in areas concerning sanitation and water, health, education, agriculture, and entrepreneurship.

Working in rural Africa alongside local chiefs, the villagers’ council and partner organisations, the collaborative work is used to ensure that local efforts are fortified, according to the Foundation.

Moreover, their website mentions that funding is used to help the communities, bearing the needs of the locals in mind, incorporating their ideas too. Solutions are purely suggested, not forced upon people.

One example of the comparatively recently-started Foundation’s work is in a small village in Ghana called Akokoa. Workers began their tasks on 1st April 2014, hitting ground water 26 days later. This gave villages access to clean water for the first time in years.

A playground for the children of Wonderful Love Nursery and Primary School was built in the same West Africa village the next month. This followed what the Foundation says was a generous donation from the Atlanta Nursing Home in Ireland.

Some of the Foundation’s other work there includes building a small chicken farm and a small organic vegetable farm. A classroom and a schoolteacher have also been provided, and the charity will soon start work in Uganda, a place Tore was very concerned with.

The Tore Eikeland Foundation is associated with Projects Abroad – an international organiser and administrator of volunteer and internship programs and placements.

Dr Peter Slowe, founder and Director of Projects Abroad, a trustee of the Tore Eikeland Foundation, as well as a former economic advisor to Tony Blair and his government, had some words to say about Tore.

“We would like, above all, to be Tore-minded with his great clarity of vision. He knew that he could help create a better world. This is our mission too: Real things for real people based on fine internationalist ideas of care and respect,” he told The Foreigner.

Dr Slowe said that many people miss Tore but that that will fade eventually, with the exception of his family and friends.

Tore Eikeland was one of 77 victims who died as a result of the terrorist’s twin attacks on Oslo and Utøya Island.



Published on Friday, 1st August, 2014 at 22:47 under the news category, by Manisha Choudhari.
Last updated on 1st August 2014 at 22:59.

This post has the following tags: utoya, 22july, norway, terror, government.





  
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