Norway academic makes the organist redundant / News / The Foreigner

Norway academic makes the organist redundant. A Trondheim-based music technology professor could be putting organists out of a job if his invention takes off. Norwegian University of Science and Technology professor Øyvind Brandtsegg has found a way of directing what an organ plays by using just his voice. Using a microphone connected to a laptop, the organ interprets anything he sings or says and produces new musical pieces. His computer, a Dell Precision M6500 with an Intel i7 8-core Pentium processor and 12 GB of RAM plays the actual organ via a midi interface. “The talking organ translator software (from microphone audio in to key presses on the organ) was written in ‘Csound’,” professor Brandtsegg tells The Foreigner. He has also used the same language to build other new musical instruments, for example the Hadron Particle Synthesizer.

norwaymusictechnology, computer-controlledorgannorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norway academic makes the organist redundant

Published on Friday, 1st February, 2013 at 18:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 1st February 2013 at 20:03.

A Trondheim-based music technology professor could be putting organists out of a job if his invention takes off.

Professor Øyvind Brandtsegg
Professor Øyvind Brandtsegg
Photo: Øyvind Brandtsegg


Norwegian University of Science and Technology professor Øyvind Brandtsegg has found a way of directing what an organ plays by using just his voice.

Using a microphone connected to a laptop, the organ interprets anything he sings or says and produces new musical pieces.

His computer, a Dell Precision M6500 with an Intel i7 8-core Pentium processor and 12 GB of RAM plays the actual organ via a midi interface.

“The talking organ translator software (from microphone audio in to key presses on the organ) was written in ‘Csound’,” professor Brandtsegg tells The Foreigner.

He has also used the same language to build other new musical instruments, for example the Hadron Particle Synthesizer.

Instrument-makers Åkerman och Lund in Sweden built the actual organ.

What is the purpose of the work?

“It’s to explore new instruments and find new ways of playing music”, he says, “It also takes electronic music out into the acoustic domain,” says the professor.

His invention recently performed at a concert in the Organ Hall of Olavshallen in Trondheim. The main programme for the concert was the music of US-born composer Conlon Nancarrow.

Nancarrow, who died in 1997, is best known for his pieces for player piano – which has been in existence since the mid-1800s, with a mechanism operating the piano action using pre-programmed perforated paper.

The composer was one of the first ones to employ musical instruments as mechanical machines. His pieces greatly exceed the ability of human performers.

More than 200 notes-per-second are played during one of the pieces. The musical effect of this resembles more a cloud of sound than what one would normally perceive as a melody.

A player piano was also used in the Trondheim concert, combined with the computer-controlled church organ.

“The audience was very interested to be able to see the keys moving. It’s also intriguing for them to see the processes a computer uses,” Professor Øyvind Brandtsegg explains.

How is this music different?

“The processes in a computer are linked to the music itself. Rather than thinking in terms of chords and notes, this kind of music may be seen as a representation of such a process,” he answers.

Is music not also an infinite collection of algorithms?

“Yes, that’s correct. It’s also interesting to be able to follow the process music goes through, and the way we are able to appreciate the development of a simple melody as it evolves.”

Professor Brandtsegg’s next concert is this weekend on Sunday 3rd February at 14:00.

Details can be found here.



Published on Friday, 1st February, 2013 at 18:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 1st February 2013 at 20:03.

This post has the following tags: norwaymusictechnology, computer-controlledorgannorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!