Norway among worst in traffic fatalities / News / The Foreigner

Norway among worst in traffic fatalities. Norwegian road deaths have decreased but there is still more work to do, a top traffic researcher says. Traffic fatalities across Europe have fallen to their lowest figure since 1954, according to the European Safety Transport Council (ESTC). Despite recent encouraging results, though, Norway’s decrease is only greater than those of Romania, Malta, and Bulgaria, reports Aftenposten. “Norway has done well regarding traffic safety for a long time. This leading position has now been lost, and we must rid ourselves of the ‘champion of the world’ thinking about traffic safety in this country, that seems to have applied from time to time,” Rune Elvik, head of research at the Institute of Transport Economics (TØI), writes in their magazine ‘Samferdsel’.

norwegianroaddeaths, europeansafetytransportcouncilfigures



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Norway among worst in traffic fatalities

Published on Friday, 24th June, 2011 at 18:15 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 24th June 2011 at 18:32.

Norwegian road deaths have decreased but there is still more work to do, a top traffic researcher says.

On the road
On the road
Photo: MGSpiller/Flickr


Traffic fatalities across Europe have fallen to their lowest figure since 1954, according to the European Safety Transport Council (ESTC). Despite recent encouraging results, though, Norway’s decrease is only greater than those of Romania, Malta, and Bulgaria, reports Aftenposten.

“Norway has done well regarding traffic safety for a long time. This leading position has now been lost, and we must rid ourselves of the ‘champion of the world’ thinking about traffic safety in this country, that seems to have applied from time to time,” Rune Elvik, head of research at the Institute of Transport Economics (TØI), writes in their magazine ‘Samferdsel’.

Whilst child traffic deaths have sunk to their lowest level ever, ESTC statistics show that Norway has seen a 29% decrease in road deaths, generally, 14% below the EU average. Ahead of Norway lie 26 countries with better progress.   

Branding Bulgaria and Romania as “countries we [Norwegians] regard as being amongst Europe’s poor relations, and with inferior democracies”, a pessimistic Mr Elvik blames the media for “a completely unrealistic belief that mid-dividers could revolutionise trafficsafety in Norway.”

“There is no doubt these are an extremely effective traffic safety measure, but they are unsuitable for 90 percent of Norway’s road network, meaning they will never be installed,” he continues, advocating more police controls instead.

Traffic researcher at SINTEF Dagfinn Moe would rather look on the bright side, however.

“A rankingis a ranking. We end up in the same class as Romania and Bulgaria regarding progress in the last ten years because Norway is a low-risk country in relation to the number of kilometres driven.”

Admitting ESTC’s figures do not mean Norwegians should rest on their laurels, Mr Moe says, “We are working hard in this country to reduce the number of traffic-related injuries and deaths. At the same time, the point is about bringing down the death toll, not a race between European countries.”




Published on Friday, 24th June, 2011 at 18:15 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 24th June 2011 at 18:32.

This post has the following tags: norwegianroaddeaths, europeansafetytransportcouncilfigures.





  
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