Norway “an almost perfect place to live” / News / The Foreigner

Norway “an almost perfect place to live”. Survey results content minister, but worry philosopher. Despite the fact a recent citizen survey shows there is room for improvement in public services, 86 percent of all Norwegians think their country is the icing on the cake. “Dangerous” This concerns the philosopher Einar Øverenget, head of the Humanistisk akademi in Oslo.

norway, norwegians, top, country, welfare, nav, nsb, positive, satisfied



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Norway “an almost perfect place to live”

Published on Thursday, 14th January, 2010 at 21:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 18th January 2010 at 21:00.

Survey results content minister, but worry philosopher.

Norwegian flag over Bergen
Norwegian flag over Bergen
Photo: alex-s/Flickr


Despite the fact a recent citizen survey shows there is room for improvement in public services, 86 percent of all Norwegians think their country is the icing on the cake.

“Dangerous”

This concerns the philosopher Einar Øverenget, head of the Humanistisk akademi in Oslo.

“There’s nothing wrong with being satisfied, but it can be a little dangerous if it becomes part of our culture. It will be difficult to educate and bring up the next generation if we haven’t got anything to challenge us,” he tells NRK.

Øverenget goes on to say that whilst Norway’s extremely well-functioning state benefit system is a good thing to have – being the envy of many other countries – happiness means having something to strive towards.

“Satisfaction isn’t just about having every material need fulfilled; it’s the experience of having power and authority over one’s life, about being able to do new and difficult things. One of the challenges in our welfare society is a belief that the state will take care of everything. People become sluggish and passive.”

On the right path

“The survey shows we’ve done some things right. We’ve built up equality and a welfare society, and developed a way of life that people are happy with,” says Rigmor Aasrud, the Minister of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs, who’s department commissioned the survey.

Norwegians are also content with their public libraries, government-owned wine and spirits shops (Vinmonopolet), doctors, and colleges, according to the study.

However, Aasrud admits that the 50 percent of those asked believe that the public services waste taxpayers’ money; experiencing difficulty finding their way through the state system.

“It is a serious problem that our citizens have this impression of how public resources are used. One of our most important tasks in the coming years is to ensure that the public sector is getting the maximum out of the money invested. Together with the Minister of Finance and the other Cabinet ministers, I’m going to give this priority in the time ahead,” Aasrud says in a press statement.

And bottom of the class come the Welfare and Labour Administration (NAV), and the State Railways (NSB). This may come as no surprise, considering that both organisations have been criticised for long waiting-times and delays.




Published on Thursday, 14th January, 2010 at 21:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 18th January 2010 at 21:00.

This post has the following tags: norway, norwegians, top, country, welfare, nav, nsb, positive, satisfied.





  
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