Norway archaeologists find ancient coin in Trondheim / News / The Foreigner

Norway archaeologists find ancient coin in Trondheim. The believed some 1,230-year-old coin was found during an excavation of a Viking farm in Trondheim, mid-Norway. Its age and the letters remaining on it confirm it to be from the time Charlemagne was king (742-814). This makes it an unusual find in Norway. “It’s a very special coin for us because it is the oldest Charlemagne one we are aware of that is in Norway. All the others we know of are from after he became emperor,” NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Jon Anders Risvaag told NRK.

vikingsnorway, oldcoinsnorway, archeology



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Norway archaeologists find ancient coin in Trondheim

Published on Friday, 7th June, 2013 at 07:05 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

The believed some 1,230-year-old coin was found during an excavation of a Viking farm in Trondheim, mid-Norway.

The Charlemagne period coin
The Charlemagne period coin
Photo: NTNU/Flickr


Its age and the letters remaining on it confirm it to be from the time Charlemagne was king (742-814). This makes it an unusual find in Norway.

“It’s a very special coin for us because it is the oldest Charlemagne one we are aware of that is in Norway. All the others we know of are from after he became emperor,” NTNU’s (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Jon Anders Risvaag told NRK.

The archaeologist states a previous coin found in Nord-Trøndelag in 1838 is 10-20 years older.

This new discovery will be displayed at some point in the future.

Other recent archaeological discoveries in Norway were a rare ‘illegal’ German coin from the time of King Henry III on a royal farm in Avaldsnes in the southwest.

A previously unknown Viking area in eastern Norway’s Sandefjord in Gokstadhaugen was discovered in 2012 with a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and magnetometer.

Stone Age decorated figurines were found near Bergen in March the same year, as was a Viking sword on a construction site in Melhus, Sør-Trøndelag county.

Across the North Sea, archaeologists working in Scotland discovered a significant Viking grave.



Published on Friday, 7th June, 2013 at 07:05 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: vikingsnorway, oldcoinsnorway, archeology.





  
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