Norway asylum seeker wins right of stay appeal / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway asylum seeker wins right of stay appeal. The 36-year-old Pakistan man’s five-year struggle against the Norwegian government and Immigration Appeals Board (UNE) ends in victory. Sohail Akbar is a wanted man and fears a death penalty in his home country after two people were shot and killed in Gujarat in 2002. Two people have already had this sentence pronounced. He fled from Pakistan whilst his wife was pregnant with the couple’s fourth child. He believes the accusations against him are politically-motivated because his father does not support a particular Party whilst being politically active himself.

norwayasylum, asylumseekersnorway, norwayimmigration



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norway asylum seeker wins right of stay appeal

Published on Tuesday, 11th March, 2014 at 11:09 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

The 36-year-old Pakistan man’s five-year struggle against the Norwegian government and Immigration Appeals Board (UNE) ends in victory.



Sohail Akbar is a wanted man and fears a death penalty in his home country after two people were shot and killed in Gujarat in 2002. Two people have already had this sentence pronounced.

He fled from Pakistan whilst his wife was pregnant with the couple’s fourth child. He believes the accusations against him are politically-motivated because his father does not support a particular Party whilst being politically active himself.

Mr Akbar applied for asylum in Norway in 2008, but this was turned down. The grounds were that immigration officials’ opinion was that his family had sufficient funds to buy his way out by paying the victims’ families and he could travel home.

He lost his initial case in Oslo District Court in 2012, but Borgarting Court of Appeal judges thought the Immigration Appeals Board has placed too much emphasis on the certainty of an agreement for blood money.

They also believe the UNE focused too little attention to the danger of the death penalty sentence being carried out should Mr Akbar have to return to Pakistan, reported Norwegian broadcaster NRK.

The Court of Appeal ruled that it is most likely that the defendant could enter into a blood money deal "in view of the reduced standard of proof required in cases regarding the death penalty.”

"As far as the Court of Appeal can see, the UNE in their assessment have also not given any particular weighting to that NN (the defendant is not named in the judgment) claims that he has not had anything to do with the killings," the ruling also reads.

The appellate court believes the UNE must take account of political developments and religious groups who are working for the death penalty in Pakistan. The country is apparently not a signatory to international conventions banning the death penalty.

“This totally changes my life,” Sohail Akbar told NRK. “I’ve had a very complicated life the past ten years. I miss my family every day and am very tired. I’ve never seen my nine-year-old son.”

The UNE still has the possibility of appealing the ruling to the Supreme Court, and is currently considering their options.

Facts about the Death Penalty in Pakistan:                   

  • 356 death penalty sentences were passed in the South Asia country in 2010 (figures from Amnesty International and the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan).
  • Hanging is the only method of execution, in practice.
  • Other methods may be legally permissible (source: deathpenaltyworldwide.org)



Published on Tuesday, 11th March, 2014 at 11:09 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayasylum, asylumseekersnorway, norwayimmigration.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!