Norway authorities threw Taliban Minister out quietly / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway authorities threw Taliban Minister out quietly. Former Taliban Minister Abdul Rauf Mohammed was secretly deported from Norway on the 8th of July. He was formally expelled five years ago. The Ministry of Justice and Public Security said Mohammad poses a threat to Norwegian and allied interests. He worked in the Taliban’s Ministry of Health between 1996 and 1999, which gave him key information on them. He would also be Acting Minister of Health on occasion, NRK reported, Tuesday.

taliban, norway, afghanistan, pst



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Norway authorities threw Taliban Minister out quietly

Published on Tuesday, 5th August, 2014 at 20:10 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.

Former Taliban Minister Abdul Rauf Mohammed was secretly deported from Norway on the 8th of July. He was formally expelled five years ago.



The Ministry of Justice and Public Security said Mohammad poses a threat to Norwegian and allied interests.

He worked in the Taliban’s Ministry of Health between 1996 and 1999, which gave him key information on them. He would also be Acting Minister of Health on occasion, NRK reported, Tuesday.

Mohammad’s application for asylum was approved in 2000. The Police Security Service (PST) also applied for family reunion to get his family to safety from Pakistan to Norway for his continued cooperation.

This, which occurred after 9/11, was even though they did not fulfil the requirements for residence under these regulations.

The application was granted. The PST had already told the Directorate of Immigration (UDI) that Mohammad was cooperating with Western intelligence services – including them – and getting the information Mohammad had quickly was of utmost importance. They also regarded him as a key bargaining card.

According to VG, Islamist groups plotting terror in Norway had ties with the Mosque where Mohammad served as Imam and mentor in the Scandinavian country.

The PST subsequently took action against 25 people in this Islamist community in 2009. Mohammad denied all claims of terrorist ties and said he is teaching ideology at a meeting at Oslo’s Litteraturhuset the same year.

Norway’s UDI had issued his first expulsion order after he had been convicted of violence against his daughter. Mohammad was sentenced to 120 days in jail but not deported.

The Immigration Appeals Board (UNE) formally expelled Mohammad in 2011 on the grounds of national interests. This was done at the behest of the Ministry of Justice.

John Christian Elden, Mohammad’s former lawyer, appealed the expulsion and asked the UNE to provide additional grounds for the decision.

Mohammad was transported to Trandum Police Immigration Detention Centre last month and spent one day there, before being put on a plane back to Kabul in Afghanistan.

His current lawyer Brynjar Meling, The Ministry of Justice and Public Security, and The Immigration Appeals Board do not wish to comment on the case.



Published on Tuesday, 5th August, 2014 at 20:10 under the news category, by Susanne Tunge Østhus.

This post has the following tags: taliban, norway, afghanistan, pst.





  
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