Norway bottom of EU regulations class / News / The Foreigner

Norway bottom of EU regulations class. Norway and Iceland are poorest regarding introducing new EU rules on time, according to the EFTA Surveillance Authority. The bi-annual scoreboard monitors how well non EU members Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein comply with their transposition obligations under the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement. The so-termed transposition deficit indicates how many internal market rules and principles EEA states have failed to introduce by the requirement deadline. 

norway, eu, eea



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Norway bottom of EU regulations class

Published on Friday, 18th July, 2014 at 12:44 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

Norway and Iceland are poorest regarding introducing new EU rules on time, according to the EFTA Surveillance Authority.

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EEA bad boys Norway and Iceland are not hurrying themselves to comply with EU regulations introduction.Thumb down
Photo: Swissmacky/Shutterstock Images


The bi-annual scoreboard monitors how well non EU members Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein comply with their transposition obligations under the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement.

The so-termed transposition deficit indicates how many internal market rules and principles EEA states have failed to introduce by the requirement deadline. 

Both Iceland and Norway had their worst rankings in the last two Scoreboards since their introduction in 1997.

July 2014’s Market Scoreboard shows that Norway’s deficit has increased from 1.8 to 1.9 per cent since the last one. This is the second highest deficit in the entire EEA and corresponds to 21 overdue directives.

Norway’s number of outstanding regulations increased from 24 to 30 in May 2014. Iceland had 76 overdue regulations, 41 fewer than that of the previous scoreboard.

Overdue regulation numbers for Norway and Iceland in November 2013 were 24 and 117, respectively – an increased for Iceland of 82 than the previous Scoreboard.

The average for the 28 countries of the Union is 0.7% and none higher than 1.5%, which puts Norway and Iceland bottom of the list of 31 EEA countries.

“Once again we must call upon Iceland and Norway to do their utmost to get out of this unfortunate situation. There is no level playing field and no real internal market without effective implementation of and compliance with common rules,” said ESA president Oda Helen Sletnes in a statement.

While ESA has said “Liechtenstein is also moving in the wrong direction”, the country is still within its transposition deficit target maximum of one per cent “after having been well below the target in the past years.”

ESA made it clear to Norway and Iceland in July this year that they will be taken to the EFTA Court for procrastination regarding six cases in total.

“Therefore, the Authority has stepped up its efforts to ensure that the States honour their obligations under the EEA Agreement,” Ms Sletnes concluded.




Published on Friday, 18th July, 2014 at 12:44 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.

This post has the following tags: norway, eu, eea.





  
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