Norway broadcaster to examine Norwegian identity / News / The Foreigner

Norway broadcaster to examine Norwegian identity. Being in a house with eight people of different nationalities and cultures can go either way. NRK has decided to show what it means to be Norwegian from a multi and mono-cultural perspective. Based on the UK Channel Four’s TV series ‘Make Bradford British’, the state license-funded Norwegian major is planning to make its own variant. ‘Norsk nok?’ (or ‘Norwegian Enough?’) is planned for transmission from the autumn of 2013. The purpose of the programme is to see if people really know one another and if it is possible to live together in closer proximity, but in an increasingly culturally divided Norwegian society.

norwayimmigration, norwegianidentity, foreignersnorway



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Norway broadcaster to examine Norwegian identity

Published on Tuesday, 27th November, 2012 at 17:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 27th November 2012 at 18:06.

Being in a house with eight people of different nationalities and cultures can go either way. NRK has decided to show what it means to be Norwegian from a multi and mono-cultural perspective.

Norwegian border
Norwegian border
Photo: Hardo Müller/Flickr


Based on the UK Channel Four’s TV series ‘Make Bradford British’, the state license-funded Norwegian major is planning to make its own variant. ‘Norsk nok?’ (or ‘Norwegian Enough?’) is planned for transmission from the autumn of 2013.

The purpose of the programme is to see if people really know one another and if it is possible to live together in closer proximity, but in an increasingly culturally divided Norwegian society.

All Norwegian-speaking foreigners/immigrants and ethnic nationals can apply. The list of candidates will then be whittled-down to some 50 interviewees.

The eight participants finally selected – which will include some so-called ‘ethnic Norwegians’ – will spend time together somewhere or other in Oslo.

NRK executive editor Turid Grønlund underlines the broadcaster is not actively hunting for conflicts like in programmes ‘Big Brother’ or ‘Paradise Hotel’, for example. They are more interested on focusing on the actual people and the different dialects to mirror the country.

Foreigners and immigrants live in many parts of Norway but the participants will have to travel to Oslo. She tells The Foreigner this is “partly for practical reasons.”

“It’s also due to our budget. We can’t spend money travelling up and down the country to film people, though we did consider it. Moreover, Norway’s biggest multicultural population lives in the capital,” she says.

Statistics Norway (SSB) reports there are some 547,000 immigrants residing in Norway, and roughly 108,000 Norway-born children with immigrant parents.

These two groups together comprise about 3.1 percent of the total population. Oslo has the largest share, with approximately 139,000 – some 23 percent of the capital’s inhabitants.

Mrs Grønlund adds that, “30 to 40 percent of children in Oslo’s schools have a different ethnic origin than Norwegian, though you can still find some schools without these.”

Why are you running the series?

“Because Norway is a multicultural society and it’s interesting to find out what it means to be Norwegian and which values apply today,” she explains.

“We also want to challenge what is specifically Norwegian in relation to references from 50 years ago, as well as how Norwegian you have to be to be considered Norwegian in relation to others and yourself.”

So what does it mean to be Norwegian would you say?

“You must accept Norwegian legislation, human rights laws, religious freedom, and have respect for other people”, she says, naming traditional governmental values,” but I’m not particularly concerned about going for a walk in the mountains, for example.”

Walking in the mountains is a traditional form of Norwegian escapism. The mountains are a national icon.

All forms of skiing on the icon are a popular national pastime and retreat. It is often used by the mainstream Norwegian media as a way of illustrating the meeting between two cultures on a slope of national homogeneity.

It both makes the foreigner accessible, and allows him/her to understand the path to successful integration.

Moreover, brown cheese (all forms), and confectionary manufacturer Freia’s “Kvikk Lunsj” – known as “Kit-Kat” in some countries – also form part of these Norwegian sporting tradition.

The “matpakke, which contains bread, cheese/sliced meat, and cumber/tomato/some colour pepper is more often than not part of the ritual. All of these edible items can be ingested with some fruit, and washed down with coffee from a thermos.

Who is your target group?

“It’s a broad category. Anybody who is interested in the Norwegian society and the society they and we wish to live in, really,” says Turid Grønlund.

Mrs Grønlund does not yet know if the series will have English subtitles for viewers who do not speak Norwegian, “but it’s a good point,” she concludes.




Published on Tuesday, 27th November, 2012 at 17:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 27th November 2012 at 18:06.

This post has the following tags: norwayimmigration, norwegianidentity, foreignersnorway.





  
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