Norway child asylum seekers loaded with too much responsibility / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway child asylum seekers loaded with too much responsibility. Unaccompanied 15 to 18-year-old asylum seekers have to fend for themselves to far too high a degree in reception centres, a researcher declares. “Amongst other things, they have to take charge of their own diet and finances. We believe it’s a major responsibility to impose on children,” Hilde Lidén at the Institute of Social Research (ISF) told Aftenposten, observing that this group are treated half as children and half as adults. Ms Lidén thinks that the reception centres are not providing adequate care and services. The children are also not receiving a good diet, with no follow-ups in cases involving warnings about human trafficking.

norwayasylumsseekers, norwayimmigration, unaccompaniedminors



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Norway child asylum seekers loaded with too much responsibility

Published on Wednesday, 13th February, 2013 at 16:14 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Unaccompanied 15 to 18-year-old asylum seekers have to fend for themselves to far too high a degree in reception centres, a researcher declares.



“Amongst other things, they have to take charge of their own diet and finances. We believe it’s a major responsibility to impose on children,” Hilde Lidén at the Institute of Social Research (ISF) told Aftenposten, observing that this group are treated half as children and half as adults.

Ms Lidén thinks that the reception centres are not providing adequate care and services. The children are also not receiving a good diet, with no follow-ups in cases involving warnings about human trafficking.

It has been found that many children simply disappear from these centres. PRESS Save the Children organisation staff have criticised police for allegedly failing in their duties investigating these cases.

85 children have vanished from these facilities over the last year. PRESS suspects minors being included in the Dublin Agreement is one major contributory factor to these disappearances.

According to the Institute of Social Research’s Hilde Lidén, “in practice, no-one takes overall responsibility when unaccompanied asylum seekers without any relatives disappear out of municipalities. The system’s failing.”

A joint ISF and other research institutes’ Directorate of Immigration-commissioned (UDI) report regarding reception centre conditions – which Ms Lidén comments on – suggests ways the system could be improved. This especially includes increased expertise at centres and better education possibilities.

“We will now carefully review the report and consider which measures we can follow-up with within our present framework conditions,” stated the UDI’s Christine Wilberg

“Moreover, we’ll consider whether there is a need for measures which imply changes in the system and to regulations,” she added.



Published on Wednesday, 13th February, 2013 at 16:14 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: norwayasylumsseekers, norwayimmigration, unaccompaniedminors.





  
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