Norway coalition: Eight core areas for four years / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway coalition: Eight core areas for four years. Norway’s Conservative (H) and Progress (FrP) Parties concluded their negotiations, presenting the issues that will be basis up until 2017, Monday. The 75-page long political platform contains eight main points that underpin the new government policy. Incoming Conservative Prime Minister Erna Solberg stated during the press conference that striking a balance between the two governing Parties is not a priority.

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Norway coalition: Eight core areas for four years

Published on Tuesday, 8th October, 2013 at 15:28 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last Updated on 8th October 2013 at 21:53.

Norway’s Conservative (H) and Progress (FrP) Parties concluded their negotiations, presenting the issues that will be basis up until 2017, Monday.



The 75-page long political platform contains eight main points that underpin the new government policy.

Incoming Conservative Prime Minister Erna Solberg stated during the press conference that striking a balance between the two governing Parties is not a priority.

“The main purpose has been to find solutions that Norway needs in the years ahead,” said Ms. Solberg.

There as been much excitement related to how much influence the Progress Party will have with its collaboration with the Conservative Party, reported TV2.

Progress leader Siv Jensen stated the platform shows the Party have kept their word, adding that not everything will get passed, however.

“We have struggled for 40 years for much of this, and we finally get the opportunity to implement this policy,” said Ms Jensen.

“We will be honest about not receiving approval for everything,” she further stated.

The eight-point political platform touches upon several issues regarding safety, education and health. It fails to cover important environmental issues, however.

Competiveness for Norwegian jobs: Increase competiveness within society and ensure that the Norwegian economy doesn’t depend entirely on oil. Measures are:

  • Stepping up funding for industrial research.
  • Further developing Innovation Norway.
  • Establishing an innovation exchange to connect entrepreneurs and private capital. Consider linking these to tax incentives.
  • Ensuring a good and predictable framework for the tourism industry.
  • Investing in research and development within the fishery and aquaculture sectors, especially to increase the added value of Norwegian export goods.

An easier life: Individuals should be given more freedom to manage their own lives through less bureaucracy, lower taxes and regulations.This will be achieved by:

  • Reducing capital tax, raising the tax-free allowance, and eliminating inheritance tax.
  • Lowering taxes for wage earners by raising allowance and the surtax threshold.
  • Changing tax policy to encourage employee ownership.
  • Changing Vinmonoplet’s hours. The government-owned alcohol store should open and close at the same time as stores that sell beer.
  • Increase the use of private and nonprofit resources in the public welfare production.

Education should provide opportunities for all: Investing in knowledge by improving teacher and nursery staff training. An increase in knowledge will ensure Norwegian competiveness in the future, the government says:

  • Introducing a five-year master’s degree in education.
  • Stimulating a closer cooperation between the schools, industries and research areas.
  • Increasing uptake capacity in the engineering and science fields.
  • Strengthening medical research.
  • Increasing support for research so that it represents 3 percent of the GDP by 2030.
  • Simplifying the bureaucratic process for applications for research funding.

Transport: Use more oil money to invest in roads, rails and other infrastructure. Also:

  • Reduce toll portions.
  • Establish an infrastructure fund of NOK 100 billion, which will be earmarked in the state budget for the development of transport and infrastructure.
  • Aim to increase highway speed limits to 130 km/h.
  • Develop a national highway plan.
  • Provide mandatory funding for major transport solutions in the largest cities.

Safety and enhanced responsiveness: Emphasis on personal safety and the fight against crime. The new government wants to ensure that Norway is better equipped to deal with possible future crises. To do this, they promise to:

  • Allow police to bear arms at all times.
  • Raise penalties for people who have committed multiple offenses.
  • Build more prisons.
  • Modernize and strengthen the civil emergency planning in the Norwegian Civil Defense.

A welfare boost for the elderly and sick: This point includes developments and improvements in fields that affect patients, the elderly, drug addicts, and people with mental disabilities.

  • Establish a staffing and quality standard within the care sector.
  • Strengthen support for services for people with dementia.
  • Buy more private health care.
  • Open more reception centres for addicts in major cities.
  • Strengthen treatment in mental health care.

A stronger social safety net by:

  • Giving children under the child care more personalized schooling.
  • Reviewing the rules of aftercare so to provide more efficient follow-ups for children over 18.
  • Ensure that more people can attend important social arenas regardless of their parent’s income level.

Vibrant local democracy: The new government wants to conduct a municipality reform that will allow municipalities to keep more of their own revenues. Along with this, the government wants to:

  • Introduce a trial scheme that transfers state and county responsibilities to the municipalities.
  • Remove the residence requirement.
  • Give local authorities greater influence in the establishment of reception centres.



Published on Tuesday, 8th October, 2013 at 15:28 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last updated on 8th October 2013 at 21:53.

This post has the following tags: norwaygovernment, coalitionnorway.





  
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