Norway cycle road rules as round as the wheels / News / The Foreigner

Norway cycle road rules as round as the wheels. In the continuing battle for road supremacy, cyclists and motorists of all nationalities may be better off just walking. Norway is not the easiest of countries to drive in. Motorists have to stay observant about speed limits that fluctuate quicker than you can say “Statens vegvesen” (Public Roads Administration). Vehicles coming from the right on certain roads have priority Previous articles on The Foreigner have highlighted the following bureaucratic and public conundrums: Rogaland drivers are notoriously bad at coping with roundabouts.Police stop old ladies for driving too slowly.Sneaking on others is popular.Hooting to greet friends is illegal.So is not using indicators.Road officials bungle speed signs.Norwegians cannot wait in traffic.Drunk ones drive to Sweden.Complacency and agression are commonplace.Police forget own vehicles’ MOTs.Police favour violent wardens.Immigrants apparently are a higher road hazard.Royal automatic gearboxes stump police.Motorists get fined for creativity.Driving is slower, reportedly pleasant, but roads are worse.Eight-year-olds are allowed to drive (just on TV).

norwaydriving, cyclingnorway, pedestriansnorway



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Norway cycle road rules as round as the wheels

Published on Wednesday, 17th October, 2012 at 14:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 17th October 2012 at 14:58.

In the continuing battle for road supremacy, cyclists and motorists of all nationalities may be better off just walking.

The old new bicycle from Canadian Tire (illus. photo)
The old new bicycle from Canadian Tire (illus. photo)
Photo: Erle/Picasaweb


Norway is not the easiest of countries to drive in. Motorists have to stay observant about speed limits that fluctuate quicker than you can say “Statens vegvesen” (Public Roads Administration). Vehicles coming from the right on certain roads have priority

Previous articles on The Foreigner have highlighted the following bureaucratic and public conundrums:

  1. Rogaland drivers are notoriously bad at coping with roundabouts.
  2. Police stop old ladies for driving too slowly.
  3. Sneaking on others is popular.
  4. Hooting to greet friends is illegal.
  5. So is not using indicators.
  6. Road officials bungle speed signs.
  7. Norwegians cannot wait in traffic.
  8. Drunk ones drive to Sweden.
  9. Complacency and agression are commonplace.
  10. Police forget own vehicles’ MOTs.
  11. Police favour violent wardens.
  12. Immigrants apparently are a higher road hazard.
  13. Royal automatic gearboxes stump police.
  14. Motorists get fined for creativity.
  15. Driving is slower, reportedly pleasant, but roads are worse.
  16. Eight-year-olds are allowed to drive (just on TV).

Pedestrian crossings are somewhat circular and confusing when it comes to cyclists, however.

Rogaland police superintendant Jarle explains to newspaper Stavanger Aftenblad that, “cars have an absolute obligation to stop for pedestrians, but not for cyclists. It doesn’t mean motorists are entitled to run cyclists down, of course.”

Cyclists are still allowed to cycle on the zebra crossing, though.

“Nonetheless, you have to get off the bike and guide it [across] to have the same rights as pedestrians on a pedestrian crossing. Do not stand on one pedal, but get completely off,” he says.

Not stopping for a cyclist-cum-pedestrian that has indicated they would like to cross is punishable with fines and licence endorsements. Motorists are required to remain attentive, the paper reports.



Published on Wednesday, 17th October, 2012 at 14:45 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 17th October 2012 at 14:58.

This post has the following tags: norwaydriving, cyclingnorway, pedestriansnorway.





  
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