Norway Earth Hour more than just turning off lights / News / The Foreigner

Norway Earth Hour more than just turning off lights. As today’s Earth Hour approaches, WWF Norway brings the current Lofoten oil drilling matter into focus. Nina Jensen, general secretary of World Wildlife Fund Norway, tells The Foreigner this year’s Earth Hour is an opportunity for them “to present to the politicians the mandate of the people.” “We have no big celebrations planned at public level. Our focus is to prevent drilling for oil in vulnerable areas like Lofoten, and we want an increased involvement on the part of the politicians,” she says.

earthhournorway, earthhour, climate, environment, co2



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Norway Earth Hour more than just turning off lights

Published on Saturday, 23rd March, 2013 at 11:35 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

As today’s Earth Hour approaches, WWF Norway brings the current Lofoten oil drilling matter into focus.

Earth, Western Hemisphere
Earth, Western Hemisphere
Photo: NASA/Wikimedia Commons


Nina Jensen, general secretary of World Wildlife Fund Norway, tells The Foreigner this year’s Earth Hour is an opportunity for them “to present to the politicians the mandate of the people.”

“We have no big celebrations planned at public level. Our focus is to prevent drilling for oil in vulnerable areas like Lofoten, and we want an increased involvement on the part of the politicians,” she says.

According to her, WWF Norway has used the past week to highlight the continuous issues of preventing climate change and promoting sustainable development through dialogue with all political Parties.

So how do you want to mark this day?

“We’ll be having internal celebrations and with some dishes made from fish caught off Lofoten. We aim to save the natural beauty and the resources of the islands and prevent drilling in these very delicate and vulnerable places.”

Nina Jensen terms Norway’s oil wealth a “driving force” for the economy, but relates that “even the leading economists of Norway believe that there is too much focus on oil and gas.”

“Involvement with oil and gas is so great, so not only have the people and the natural resources taken a back seat in the minds of the companies and political Parties, but other sectors in the country are also stunted.”

She declares that all the resources in Norway are being sucked up for the oil industry.

“What are the other points of focus for the WWF?

“We’re encouraging cities in Norway to go green as much as possible. We held a city challenge where we asked cities in Norway to compare and cut their emissions in relation to other cities of the world such as San Franciso, Vancouver and Delhi.”

Oslo emerged as the national winner on due to two factors, Ms Jensen relates.

“The city is committed to being 100% renewable by 2020, and they are the world-leaders in terms of cutting down emissions through increased use of electric cars (the most in the world) and putting an efficient public transport place which cuts down the number of cars on the roads.”

Earth Hour in Norway this year is between 20:30 and 21:30 local time.   




Published on Saturday, 23rd March, 2013 at 11:35 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

This post has the following tags: earthhournorway, earthhour, climate, environment, co2.





  
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