Norway Education Minister proposes fresh higher education reform / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway Education Minister proposes fresh higher education reform. The Socialist Left’s (SV) Kristin Halvorsen calls for a new whitepaper ten years after a major Norwegian higher education reform. Mrs Halvorsen told Aftenposten the main reason for her suggestion was the government had expected that more students would have finished their higher education in due time, “even though the [previous] reform has functioned well in many areas". Among the things the minister also wants to look into is how relevant the country’s higher education is for the Norwegian job market needs.

norwayeducation, norwayuniversities



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Norway Education Minister proposes fresh higher education reform

Published on Monday, 13th May, 2013 at 10:11 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 14th May 2013 at 10:10.

The Socialist Left’s (SV) Kristin Halvorsen calls for a new whitepaper ten years after a major Norwegian higher education reform.



“Too many”

Mrs Halvorsen told Aftenposten the main reason for her suggestion was the government had expected that more students would have finished their higher education in due time, “even though the [previous] reform has functioned well in many areas".

Among the things the minister also wants to look into is how relevant the country’s higher education is for the Norwegian job market needs.

Arne Turmo of the Norwegian Confederation of Enterprise (NHO) is positive to a new whitepaper, but is uncertain which measures the minister would take as a result of it.

The NHO has been a driving force for fewer and better possibilities in higher education to improve the quality of studies.

According to him, there are over 1,900 Masters’ programmes in Norway, an increase of 50 since 2011.

"We feel that this is too many - both considering needs and quality," stated Mr Turmo.

Too few

Last year’s Times Higher Education ‘World University Rankings 2012-13’ put the cat amongst the Norwegian academic pigeons. None of the surveyed universities made it into the top 100.

University of Oslo (UiO) Professor Bjørn Stensaker declared “the whole thing’s almost a scandal”, alleging the rankings’ methodology was “something fishy”.

Education Minister Kristin Halvorsen pointed out Norwegian education and research are doing well internationally, but admitted there was room for ambitions of doing better.

The recent QS World University Rankings tell the same story. UiO came in 111th place overall.

Though by far from being a footnote, the University of Bergen (UiB), Trondheim’s University of Science and Technology (NTNU), and the University of Tromsø (UiT) were 145th, 289th, and 304th, respectively. Stavanger and Kristiansand did not make it on to this list either.

Parochial?

Three of Norway’s four Nordic peers, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland all had universities that came above 100th place.

The University of Copenhagen (51), Aarhus University (89), Sweden’s Lund University (71), Uppsala University (81), and the University of Helsinki, Finland (78).

The QS grading’s system draws six indicators together to form their international university rankings.

40 per cent is based on academic reputation from a global survey, 10 per cent employer reputation from a global survey, and 20 per cent academic journal citations.

The remaining indicators are 20 per cent faculty student ratio, 5 per cent proportion of international students, and 5 per cent proportion of international faculty.

Norway has had a reputation for trailing on research concerning in the Nordic countries.




Published on Monday, 13th May, 2013 at 10:11 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 14th May 2013 at 10:10.

This post has the following tags: norwayeducation, norwayuniversities.





  
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