Norway Electric post vehicle gets a design award / News / The Foreigner

Norway Electric post vehicle gets a design award. Several decades after people in Britain received their milk delivery via three-wheeled electric vehicle, environmentally-conscious Norway is adding a wheel to its powered postal service. It has been awarded a prize. The Norwegian Design Council annually recognises design excellence through awards in seven categories. The prizes can be many if considerable number of good designs were realised the previous year. An Honours Award is also conferred on the one judged the best of the year among all the designs so recognised. The Council conferred this year’s on the Paxster, an electric vehicle for postal delivery. The Paxster is a motorised light quadracycle, which can be registered as a moped according to the relevant EU Directive. Yet the Paxster has a weight capacity of 200 kg (about 440 pounds) and can travel 50 to 80 km (some 30 to 50 miles) before its lithium ion polymer battery needs recharging.

norwaypostalservice, loydspaxster



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Norway Electric post vehicle gets a design award

Published on Thursday, 25th April, 2013 at 11:15 under the news category, by M. Michael Brady.

Several decades after people in Britain received their milk delivery via three-wheeled electric vehicle, environmentally-conscious Norway is adding a wheel to its powered postal service. It has been awarded a prize.

Paxster postman
Paxster postman
Photo: Marius Wallin/Norsk Designråd


The Norwegian Design Council annually recognises design excellence through awards in seven categories. The prizes can be many if considerable number of good designs were realised the previous year. An Honours Award is also conferred on the one judged the best of the year among all the designs so recognised. The Council conferred this year’s on the Paxster, an electric vehicle for postal delivery.

The Paxster is a motorised light quadracycle, which can be registered as a moped according to the relevant EU Directive. Yet the Paxster has a weight capacity of 200 kg (about 440 pounds) and can travel 50 to 80 km (some 30 to 50 miles) before its lithium ion polymer battery needs recharging.

The quadracycle is a throwback to the technology of the late 19th century. Henry Ford’s first successful vehicle of June 1896 was a quadracycle with four bicycle wheels. He spoke with electrical inventor Thomas Edison and told him about the vehicle at a meeting in New York later that summer. Edison was impressed and advised Ford to keep working on it; which he did.

The rest is history. The quadracycle metamorphosed into the car. It is now back a century on, supplanting the car and its goods-carrying sibling, the van, in applications for which it is better suited.

Vans may do well at carrying goods over distance, but less so with frequent stops and starts, as in postal delivery services. Modern motorised quadracycles are better at that. They combine the load-carrying convenience of a van with the agility of a postman on foot.

Loyds Industri of Sarpsborg, a maker of specialized interior fittings for cars and vans, exploited that distinction in developing the Paxster. In making its proven postal van concepts work on a smaller physical platform, it overcame some of the limitations of vans.

Instead of having to open a door and get out of a van, the drivers of a Paxster can just lean to one side or the other to reach most mailboxes without getting out of the vehicle. It is also fitted with an auto-park/auto-start feature.

“75 percent of the costs of a letter shipment are in the very last link in the chain,” said Eirik Lier, Loyds’ head of marketing for Norway, at the award ceremony, “and now this part of the value chain gets a welcome technological and design improvement.”



Published on Thursday, 25th April, 2013 at 11:15 under the news category, by M. Michael Brady.

This post has the following tags: norwaypostalservice, loydspaxster.


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