Norway employers’ foreign-sounding names dismissal backfires / News / The Foreigner

Norway employers’ foreign-sounding names dismissal backfires. Norwegian-born immigrant children face discrimination due to their names amongst potential employers’ poor research skills. These fluent Norwegian-speaking and Norway-educated children of immigrants born in the Scandinavian country are missing out on jobs because of what is reportedly a ‘pure misunderstanding’. Research by the Institute for Social Research found that much of this was due to employers not understanding that applicants were Norwegian.

norwayjobs, immigrantsnorway



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Norway employers’ foreign-sounding names dismissal backfires

Published on Tuesday, 30th July, 2013 at 11:32 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

Norwegian-born immigrant children face discrimination due to their names amongst potential employers’ poor research skills.

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Photo: Shinealight/Wikimedia Commons


These fluent Norwegian-speaking and Norway-educated children of immigrants born in the Scandinavian country are missing out on jobs because of what is reportedly a ‘pure misunderstanding’.

Research by the Institute for Social Research found that much of this was due to employers not understanding that applicants were Norwegian.

They therefore believed these job-seekers, some of them children of Pakistani immigrants who came to Norway in the '60s and '70s now finishing their education, would not be familiar with the language or the culture.

The Institute’s Arnfinn H. Midtbøen came to his conclusions following his in-depth interviews of 42 Norwegian business leaders about this matter.

“It became very obvious during the interview process that many employers were not aware that applicants with foreign names are born and raised in Norway,” he told Vårt Land.

Why do you think this is?

“One basic and important explanation is that immigration to Norway is still quite a recent phenomenon, and the public debate has mainly been about these immigrants, not those born here,” he said to The Foreigner.

According to him, just two to three employers thought immigrants in the workplace are a positive factor due to previous experience. This was mainly due to them being located in areas where many immigrants live.

The inquiry also showed that smaller companies were quicker to dismiss applicants than larger businesses, or those in the public sector.

Discrimination based on name, with a preference for Norwegians and certain skin-colour types, is a long-standing tradition in Norway, as The Foreigner has previously reported. Some companies have problems with multiculturalism too.

Andreas Ostling, Deputy Minister of Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion, commented to Vårt Land that he believes the Norwegian labour market could miss out on vital skills if employers keep discriminating on the grounds of a name.

“Quick decisions based on gut feelings by employers seem to result in discrimination more often,” remarked Arnfinn H. Midtbøen to The Foreigner.




Published on Tuesday, 30th July, 2013 at 11:32 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: norwayjobs, immigrantsnorway.





  
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