Norway employers’ organisation cracks the whip / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway employers’ organisation cracks the whip. Federation of Norwegian Industries eyes working hours extension ahead of this year’s collective wage negotiations. Normal hours are defined as those between 6am and 5pm. 7.5 hours is counted as a standard working day length. Extra hours and/or working on public holidays attract differing rates of overtime pay.

norwayworking, unions



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Norway employers’ organisation cracks the whip

Published on Tuesday, 4th March, 2014 at 11:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 4th March 2014 at 14:03.

Federation of Norwegian Industries eyes working hours extension ahead of this year’s collective wage negotiations.



Normal hours are defined as those between 6am and 5pm. 7.5 hours is counted as a standard working day length.

Extra hours and/or working on public holidays attract differing rates of overtime pay.

The Norwegian Federation of Norwegian Industries (Norsk Industri) wants the standard working day length extended to 9pm, with the power to define employees’ hours.

Municipal sector employers’ organisation the Association of Local and Regional Authorities (KS) set the cat amongst the teachers’ pigeons recently, demanding the same possibility.

They say they do not want the number of teaching weeks to be increased from from 39 to 45 as a rule, "but would like up to 45 weeks to be organised locally."

This is designed to give teachers more time with pupils, more time for further education, and more time for cooperative efforts, they say, adding that "are not demanding teachers be at work for 37.5 hours per week", but "have more time for preperation and follow-up work."

"KS does not want the teaching load to increase, or for the municipalities should use this new deal to save money," they state.

Teachers have some eight weeks of summer holiday – in addition to the autumn and winter half-term weeks and public holidays – though some of this is time in lieu to compensate for some of their hours and duties during the school year.

It is argued that a teachers’ hours differ to regular office ones due to matters including preparation, meeting time, and administration.

Norsk Industri managing director Stein Lier-Hansen cites that industry workers increasing enjoy benefits such as leave to take their child to the doctor’s.

Moreover, employees in both the private and public municipal employees are entitled to paid time-off when moving house, or two when their child starts at a new pre-school.

“We must have flexibility so an industrial worker can work in hours without this being counted as overtime,” Mr Lier-Hansen told Dagens Næringsliv, Tuesday.



Published on Tuesday, 4th March, 2014 at 11:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 4th March 2014 at 14:03.

This post has the following tags: norwayworking, unions.





  
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