Norway Energy Minister brushes up EU energy rules / News / The Foreigner

Norway Energy Minister brushes up EU energy rules. ‘Turbo’ Tord Lien, as some Norwegian media call him, intends to turn down the power regarding vacuum cleaners the next three years. Professionals think that the EU regulations are hot air. The Minister’s decision comes due to Norway being a signatory to the EEA Agreement. Iceland and Lichtenstein are the others. Environmental concerns In 2013, the European Commission decided that energy-eating and inefficient ones of over 1600 watts should no longer be made or imported from 1st September this year. 

eu, norway, eea, efta, rules



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Norway Energy Minister brushes up EU energy rules

Published on Monday, 25th August, 2014 at 13:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Manisha Choudhari   .
Last Updated on 25th August 2014 at 14:05.

‘Turbo’ Tord Lien, as some Norwegian media call him, intends to turn down the power regarding vacuum cleaners the next three years. Professionals think that the EU regulations are hot air.

A Dyson vacuum cleaner
British inventor and industrial designer Sir James Dyson says none of his machines exceed the 1600W limit, but is seeking a seeking European court of justice judicial review of the legislation for consumers' benefit.A Dyson vacuum cleaner
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


The Minister’s decision comes due to Norway being a signatory to the EEA Agreement. Iceland and Lichtenstein are the others.

Environmental concerns

In 2013, the European Commission decided that energy-eating and inefficient ones of over 1600 watts should no longer be made or imported from 1st September this year. 

Officials allege the regulations are intended to reduce Europe’s energy use and combat climate change. The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20 per cent by 2020 compared to 1990 levels.

According to officials, the energy efficiency-intended legislation also includes performance requirements. It regards picking up dust, noise, and how dust escapes from the vacuum cleaner in relation to asthma sufferers.

“It’s just marketing”

The European Commission’s rules, based on the EU’s 2010 Energy Labelling Directive (2010/30/EU), go even further as well, banning vacuum cleaners over 900 watts in Europe and Norway from 2017.

But the new regulations, which Brussels bureaucrats say do not apply to vacuum cleaners that suck powerfully, have prompted concerns about cleaning efficiency versus wattage.

European Commission energy spokesperson Marlene Holzner explained that “It is not power that makes a vacuum cleaner perform well. […] the amount of watt does not automatically indicate how well a vacuum cleaner will clean.”

“The amount of watt indicates how much electrical power is used by the engine. Wattage has become a marketing tool, steering the market towards more power-hungry appliances. The side-effect is that a lot of electrical power is wasted and not turned into sucking power, whereas the consumer is still paying for that wasted electricity,” she said.

Own goal

Professional cleaner Linda Dykes, a professional cleaner who has appeared on UK broadcaster Channel 4’s programme Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners, told The Sunday Times, however, that “The more powerful the hoover is, the greater the suction."

“People who don't know much about vacuums don't think the wattage is important, but people that know about them do,” reported The Telegraph.

Moreover, UK consumer group Which?has criticised the European Commission’s move. They allege that householders will just use the lower-powered vacuum cleaners for longer to obtain the same cleaning effect, which would make negate the Commission’s move.

The dust has not settled

Next month’s introduction of the European Commission’s rules will not affect consumers in Norway, however, as they have yet to become adopted under legislation.

Neither the Norwegian Water and Energy Directorate (NVE) nor Energy Minister Tord Lien have any objections to the European Council’s regulations, but one EEA Agreement member country does.

Petroleum and Energy Ministry press spokesperson Håkon Smith-Isaksen told The Foreigner in an email that “a draft for an EEA resolution was accepted by all the EFTA-countries in November 2013 and sent to the EEAS (European External Action Service).”

“Then the resolution draft was withdrawn from the list of resolutions by Iceland in May and June 2014. Therefore, the matter could either reappear on the [EEAS] working group’s agenda or go back to the long list, pending a decision in Iceland,” he concluded.



Published on Monday, 25th August, 2014 at 13:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Manisha Choudhari   .
Last updated on 25th August 2014 at 14:05.

This post has the following tags: eu, norway, eea, efta, rules.





  
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