Norway eyes world’s first floating underwater tunnel / News / The Foreigner

Norway eyes world’s first floating underwater tunnel. The proposal to construct the facility beneath the Scandinavian county’s longest and deepest fjord is expected to make travelling easier. Sogn og Fjordane County’s Sognefjord in western Norway is over 4,000 feet deep and 3,000 feet wide (roughly 1,220 and 914 metres, respectively). Measuring some 4,291 feet (1,308 metres) at its deepest point, the fjord’s length runs for about 128 miles (205 km) through several western Norway municipalities.

travel, tunnels, roads, cars, lorries, subsea, paywall



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Norway eyes world’s first floating underwater tunnel

Published on Thursday, 28th July, 2016 at 13:46 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

The proposal to construct the facility beneath the Scandinavian county’s longest and deepest fjord is expected to make travelling easier.

Submerged Floating Tunnel illustration
Sognefjord, under the waters of which the proposed infrastructure would pass, is the world's second-longest one.Submerged Floating Tunnel illustration
Photo: NPRA/Vianova


Sogn og Fjordane County’s Sognefjord in western Norway is over 4,000 feet deep and 3,000 feet wide (roughly 1,220 and 914 metres, respectively).

Measuring some 4,291 feet (1,308 metres) at its deepest point, the fjord’s length runs for about 128 miles (205 km) through several western Norway municipalities.

It is the world’s second-longest fjord, beaten only by Greenland’s Scoresby Sund at some 220 miles long (approximately 350 km).

Using information and experience from deep sea foundations in connection with bridge constructions, The Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA) announced the plans for their concrete Submerged Floating Tunnel (SFT) back in 2011.

Building curved tubes of some 4,000 feet (about 6,440 metres) in length would allow vehicles to travel on a road bridge 65 to 100 feet (approximately 20-30 metres) below the surface, it is thought.

Each of them, one in each direction, would be held in place using a float system or pontoons on the surface.

The facility would also have to withstand harsh weather, as the fjords can be up to a mile deep and have very high sides.

According to Wired, Norwegian engineers are currently calculating what a submerged floating structure could handle, and how the currents might affect movement.

Building them will prove very expensive too. It is believed this will cost around USD 25bn (some EUR 22.55bn/GBP 19bn) to construct.

At the same time, they infrastructure will radically reduce journey times between south-eastern Norway’s Kristiansand in the south and Trondheim in the north.

This some 680-mile trip (almost 1,095 km) currently takes about 21 hours and involves seven ferry crossings.

If built, the underwater tubes could cut this time almost in half, with a journey of less than 11 hours.

These form part of the government’s previously announced costly and ferry-free initiative for western Norway’s E39 motorway route.

The idea of driving for periods of time underwater could sound quite daunting. But Kjersti Kvalheim Dunham, project manager overseeing the road revamp project told Wired that “Norwegians are quite used to going underwater in tunnels.”

Norway has 1,150 tunnels, with 35 of them being subsea ones. One project currently under construction is Eiganes Tunnel/Ryfast.

Involving National Road Rv13 and the E39 motorway, it is billed as being “the world’s longest subsea road tunnel, a city tunnel, and a subsea city tunnel”.

The Norwegian Public Roads Administration’s Submerged Floating Tunnels feasibility study can be found here (external link).



Published on Thursday, 28th July, 2016 at 13:46 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: travel, tunnels, roads, cars, lorries, subsea, paywall.





  
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