Norway farming gives more food for thought / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway farming gives more food for thought. Things are boiling over in parts of Norway’s agriculture industry. Amongst impending dearer choice meat cuts or cheese and a domestic piggy surplus, next year’s popular food item over-abundance is a yoke. Poor supermarket selections and paying through the nose are everyday items for many foreigners. High Norwegian wages mean pricey pork at home, recent years’ overproduction means Ukrainians bring home the bacon to a fraction of the cost – NOK 10/kg. Last year’s weather and miscalculations meant butter slipped off the supermarket shelves, but 2012’s Norwegian Christmas cookie goodies are saved.

norwayfarming, norwayeggproduction



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Norway farming gives more food for thought

Published on Thursday, 25th October, 2012 at 14:47 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Things are boiling over in parts of Norway’s agriculture industry. Amongst impending dearer choice meat cuts or cheese and a domestic piggy surplus, next year’s popular food item over-abundance is a yoke.



Poor supermarket selections and paying through the nose are everyday items for many foreigners. High Norwegian wages mean pricey pork at home, recent years’ overproduction means Ukrainians bring home the bacon to a fraction of the cost – NOK 10/kg.

Last year’s weather and miscalculations meant butter slipped off the supermarket shelves, but 2012’s Norwegian Christmas cookie goodies are saved.

Franco-Irish milk-butter-cooperation and downscaled protectionist import duties have saved the day, if not bakers’ hides – the bovine ones cannot be, as beef is in constant short supply. Only buying in from the EU and Africa has prevented a carve-up in the shopping aisles.

There is also news today for fried or boiled, scrambled or poached, and omelette-lovers. 900 tons of it.

Meat and egg farmers’ cooperative and market regulator Nortura, whose representatives told The Foreigner Norway’s pig farmers have to pay an approximately NOK 1.50/kg fine on excess supply – clamour decreased summer sales and over-production are to blame.

“There’s some rotten eggs somewhere”, "that’s a lot of omelettes”, comment two of The Foreigner’s Twitter followers.



Published on Thursday, 25th October, 2012 at 14:47 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayfarming, norwayeggproduction.





  
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