Norway Farming Minister pushes more mealtime pork / News / The Foreigner

Norway Farming Minister pushes more mealtime pork. Progress’ (FrP) Sylvi Listhaug wants to see more pork served in public institutions in Norway’s multi-faith society. Anti-discrimination officials find her comment puzzling. “We’ve always eaten pork in Norway through the years. It’s completely wrong to stop [serving] pork because Muslims have moved to Norway,” she told NRK, Friday. A stroll down supermarket aisles in Norway will reveal many different types of pork products. Amongst other variants, it appears as a traditional Christmas food item in certain parts of the country – pork ribs (‘ribbe’) and/or ‘sylte’ (bits of boiled and chopped pork made from a pig’s head).

norwayfood, pork, diets, muslims, jews



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Norway Farming Minister pushes more mealtime pork

Published on Saturday, 1st February, 2014 at 20:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Progress’ (FrP) Sylvi Listhaug wants to see more pork served in public institutions in Norway’s multi-faith society. Anti-discrimination officials find her comment puzzling.

Pig
Norway's meat industry says pork sales are declining. The Minister of Agriculture steps in to help.Pig
Photo: Teodor Ostojic/Shutterstock Images


“We’ve always eaten pork in Norway through the years. It’s completely wrong to stop [serving] pork because Muslims have moved to Norway,” she told NRK, Friday.

A stroll down supermarket aisles in Norway will reveal many different types of pork products. Amongst other variants, it appears as a traditional Christmas food item in certain parts of the country – pork ribs (‘ribbe’) and/or ‘sylte’ (bits of boiled and chopped pork made from a pig’s head).

Frankfurter-like ‘pølser’ are also a typical Norwegian Constitution Day (17th May) foodstuff item, not to mention frequently being served at barbecue gatherings.

Minister Listhaug’s comments come as the meat industry express concern about lean sales of pork. The meat has been over-abundant in recent years, but sales are now apparently declining.

According to NRK, there are no firm statistics on numbers of public sector institutions choosing not to serve pork, which are apparently for practical reasons.

Meat Industry Association managing director Bjørn-Ole Juul-Hansen said members have informed him of a clear trend, however.

“Many public institutions, pre-schools often opt out of [serving] pork in the interests of a small minority. Moreover, things can’t come to the stage where all day cares choose turkey sausage (‘pølse’) instead of pork because it's convenient,” he stated.

Mr Juul-Hansen is concerned pre-school children could develop negative attitudes towards eating the meat if they experience it as disgusting too.

Food and Agriculture Minister Sylvi Listhaug does encourage everyone who has responsibility for food in public institutions consider pork should be on the menu, as well as ensure those who do not eat the meat are offered an alternative.

“I’ve seen [Minister] Listhaug’s statement regarding pork,” an Equality and Anti-discrimination Ombudsman press spokesperson told The Foreigner in an email. “The institutions should find ways to offer alternative menus.”

How would you regard this as discrimination if more pork were served?

“Institutions like prisons, hospitals, and retirement homes are obliged to serve food that people can eat regardless of their religion’s demands. Not having an alternative to pork on the menus would be discrimination, therefore.”

How would the more pork move contravene present legislation?

“There are no problems with serving pork in public institutions as long as people are served alternative menus. However, we find her statement problematic when she apparently draws a connection between Muslims and reduced demand for pork.”

“The problem is not that Muslims don’t eat pork. The institutions can easily find ways to combine serving pork with an alternative menu for Muslims and others who don’t eat it,” the Ombudsman’s press spokesperson concludes.



Published on Saturday, 1st February, 2014 at 20:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayfood, pork, diets, muslims, jews.





  
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