Norway fish popularity powers ahead / News / The Foreigner

Norway fish popularity powers ahead. Amongst cantering reports of pork pies regarding iffy meat in prepared food, Norway’s fish sales to youths is going with the current. 16 to 29-year-old Norwegians’ appetite for fish was up 11 percent compared to other sea-inhabiting species, according to new Seafood Council figures for 2012. The industry organisation also states shop sales of fish increased 40 percent on 2011, with 31 visits by them the fish-selling merchants in 2012.

norwayfishexports, norwayfish, sushi



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Norway fish popularity powers ahead

Published on Thursday, 21st March, 2013 at 15:41 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Amongst cantering reports of pork pies regarding iffy meat in prepared food, Norway’s fish sales to youths is going with the current.

Sushi
Sushi
Photo: Gladmat


16 to 29-year-old Norwegians’ appetite for fish was up 11 percent compared to other sea-inhabiting species, according to new Seafood Council figures for 2012.

The industry organisation also states shop sales of fish increased 40 percent on 2011, with 31 visits by them the fish-selling merchants in 2012.

“We can see that households with just one person – meaning those who are single – are buy more seafood. Increased choice of pre-prepared portion-sized food probably makes it easier for this group of people to choose fish for dinner,” the Council’s Asbjørn Warwik Rørtveit says in a statement.

He adds that the salmon, cod, and herring-hungry Norwegians are the main contributor to the country’s inhabitants eating more fish.

Norwegians bought 91 percent more pre-packed and 38 percent more fresh fish fillets last year compared with 2011.

Sabi Sushi, just one company offering the Japanese food type in Norway, currently has four restaurants-come-takeaways in the southern part of the country. Two more are opening this year.

General Manager Njål Gaute Solland tells The Foreigner, “We’ve got about 80 FTEs (Full-time Equivalents) within the company.”

“We sell a considerable number of tons of fish each year in the form of our products, and serve thousands of meals,” he continues.

According to Asbjørn Rørtveit at the Norwegian Seafood Council, sales of fish have grown each Easter.

“Nevertheless, what we saw last year was major growth within the retail sector, with some increase in the hotel and restaurant one.”

“Salmon was Norway’s second-largest fish export breed after tuna, globally”, he explains, “but it was number one in Europe.”

The Council’s report on fish sales regarding Sushi is coming out after Easter.




Published on Thursday, 21st March, 2013 at 15:41 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayfishexports, norwayfish, sushi.





  
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