Norway government alcohol monopoly eyes tax free / News / The Foreigner

Norway government alcohol monopoly eyes tax free. Vinmonopolet is considering moving into the airport alcohol business as drink sales figures decline. “There’s an increase in people travelling to Sweden to buy their alcohol because of the lower taxes there. Norwegians are also generally travelling abroad more, buying their tax free on the way out and in,” Vinmonopolet press spokesperson Halvor Bing Lorentzen tells The Foreigner. Overall annual figure increases are normally between 4 and 5 per cent. Nevertheless, wine sales decreased by 0.2 per cent in the first half of 2013 compared with the same period last year. Sales of fortified wines and spirits declined by 5.6, and 3.3 per cent, respectively.

norwaywine, norwaytax-free, travelnorway



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Norway government alcohol monopoly eyes tax free

Published on Tuesday, 30th July, 2013 at 14:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 30th July 2013 at 14:51.

Vinmonopolet is considering moving into the airport alcohol business as drink sales figures decline.

Vinmonopolet Briskeby, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Vinmonopolet Briskeby, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Photo: © 2005,6, 7 Bjørn Erik Pedersen/Wikimedi


“There’s an increase in people travelling to Sweden to buy their alcohol because of the lower taxes there. Norwegians are also generally travelling abroad more, buying their tax free on the way out and in,” Vinmonopolet press spokesperson Halvor Bing Lorentzen tells The Foreigner.

Overall annual figure increases are normally between 4 and 5 per cent. Nevertheless, wine sales decreased by 0.2 per cent in the first half of 2013 compared with the same period last year. Sales of fortified wines and spirits declined by 5.6, and 3.3 per cent, respectively.

“Whilst we don’t think Norwegians are drinking less, we see the Norwegian alcohol policy is not working as well as it used to”, explains Mr Lorentzen, “and feel it would be undermined long-term.”

Just one major retailer, Heinemann, currently soaks up a good part of the profits at Norway’s major airport Oslo Gardermoen.

The German firm, which part-owns wealthy Norwegian businessman Terje Stykket’s Travel Retail Norway, also has shops at Stavanger Sola, Bergen Flesland, Trondheim Værnes, and Kristiansand Kjevik. Airports authority Avinor also gets money from these sales.

According to Mr Lorentzen, the company has not decided on their strategy yet as airports authority Avinor’s agreement with these present companies runs until the end of 2021.

“Our mission is to run a responsible alcohol sales policy in Norway, with nobody under 18 allowed to buy this. Adults purchasing alcohol for minors is prohibited too, and we also take social responsibility into account,” he says.

So is it really then just a case of shipping out one duty free company and replacing with another?

“We have to operate these sales in the same manner as they are today, but without the cosmetics, chocolates, and tobacco. Most of the profits would still go to Avinor, as well as the Norwegian government. We’re not permitted to make a lot of money as a state-owned firm,” concludes Mr Lorentzen.




Published on Tuesday, 30th July, 2013 at 14:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 30th July 2013 at 14:51.

This post has the following tags: norwaywine, norwaytax-free, travelnorway.





  
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