Norway government outlines multilingual policies / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway government outlines multilingual policies. ‘Plurilingualism is a resource that it should be valued’, says Deputy Education Minister. Government officials state that children who are introduced to more than one language at an early age are an asset. “In Whitepaper number 6 (2013-2013) to Parliament, the Norwegian government has formulated several principles with the purpose of securing high-quality education for language minority children, young adults and adults; one of them stating that plurilingualism is a resource in the Norwegian society, and that it should be valued in the education system,” Elisabet Dahle, the Socialist Left’s (SV) Deputy Minister of Education tells The Foreigner in an email following yesterday’s article.

norwegianlanguageteaching, norwayschools



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Norway government outlines multilingual policies

Published on Wednesday, 3rd April, 2013 at 16:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

‘Plurilingualism is a resource that it should be valued’, says Deputy Education Minister.



Government officials state that children who are introduced to more than one language at an early age are an asset.

“In Whitepaper number 6 (2013-2013) to Parliament, the Norwegian government has formulated several principles with the purpose of securing high-quality education for language minority children, young adults and adults; one of them stating that plurilingualism is a resource in the Norwegian society, and that it should be valued in the education system,” Elisabet Dahle, the Socialist Left’s (SV) Deputy Minister of Education tells The Foreigner in an email following yesterday’s article.

“To master your mother tongue makes it easier to learn new languages. The Whitepaper states that the language resources children and young adults possess should be valued higher. Among other examples, this means that students in upper secondary schools are provided with the possibility to take exams in a wide range of mother tongues, herby giving the students an opportunity to document their language skills. This examination scheme includes 38 different languages, and the range of languages is continually being widened subject to demand and the availability of qualified examiners,” she adds.

“A national centre to ensure that multicultural perspectives are valued at ECECs, schools, university colleges and universities was established in 2004. The National Centre for Multicultural Education (NAFO) runs competence-building programmes for work within, and leadership of, institutions concerned with the education of linguistic minorities and for the development of inclusive multicultural learning communities in Norway.”

“To offer bilingual digital teaching resources will possibly contribute to the development of language skills among children and young adults. The development of the website morsmål.no is a successful result of the cooperation between NAFO and Skoleverket in Sweden, to enhance access to digital teaching resources in several languages. The website is now available in 37 languages, and will be further developed in the years to come,” says Deputy Minister Dahle.

“According to the Norwegian Education Act section 2-8 and 3-12, pupils attending the primary and lower and upper secondary school who have a mother tongue other than Norwegian and Sami, have the right to adapted education in Norwegian until they are sufficiently proficient in Norwegian to attend the regular instruction of the school. If necessary, such pupils are also entitled to mother tongue instruction, bilingual subject teaching, or both.”

“To actively promote plurilingualism, provision is made for students with other mother tongues to develop their heritage language and have it formally credited as a foreign language both in lower and upper secondary education. Although the most frequently offered foreign languages are Spanish, German, French and Italians, there is a registered increase in students interested in Russian (102 students) and Chinese (85 – 90 students) particularly in lower secondary schools. The range of languages offered are subject to student demand, the availability of qualified language teachers and the schools’ ability to offer a selection of languages to small groups of students within their budgets.”

“In upper secondary education about 2 per cent of students choose another foreign language than French, Spanish and German as a compulsory subject.  In this category we find Italian (423 students), North Saami (188 students), Russians (157 students) and Chinese (101 students),” she concludes.



Published on Wednesday, 3rd April, 2013 at 16:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwegianlanguageteaching, norwayschools.





  
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